Fully Dehydrated Fresh Spinach

Dehydrate Spinach and Make Spinach Powder

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Have you wanted to learn How To Dehydrate Spinach To Make Flakes Or Powder? If you’re like me, sometimes I have some spinach hiding in the back of the refrigerator that I forgot about. Yes, I freeze it in small bags but I only have so much room in my small freezer. I dehydrated some Kale and it worked out great for smoothies. Of course, dehydrating spinach or kale is not going to be delectable for a salad, but for smoothies it’s great.

This post was first written in 2015, but I wanted to update the images and the information. Dehydrating food and making powders is so fun to do and can add some unique items to your storage with a little longer shelf life!

First of all, I must tell you I didn’t cut off the large stems because I was too lazy. I’m not going to cut off hundreds of stems. Nope, nada. I took two containers of spinach from Costco that weighed one pound each. I had never looked at the weight so I just laughed when I realized they only weighed one pound each. Anyway, because I didn’t single-layer the spinach totally flat I had to do two batches.

I did wash the spinach leaves just because I worry about pesticides. The containers say organic, but I wash them just because I feel better knowing I hopefully got all the possible e-Coli or other bacteria off of the leaves. I did use a salad spinner to get any extra moisture off of the leaves. In case you missed this recipe, Best Spinach Salad Recipe, or this one, Easy-To-Make Spinach Dip

Dehydrate Spinach and Make Spinach Powder

How To Dehydrate Spinach and Make Spinach Powder

Step One: Set the Dehydrator Temperature

Set up your dehydrator and set the temperature according to the item to be dried and the brand of your dehydrator. I have an Excalibur 9-Tray Dehydrator and it states I should use (125°F) = (51°C) as the temperature for my dried spinach.

Get Your Dehydrator Ready To Turn On

Step Two: Sort Through The Spinach

Pick through the fresh spinach and remove damaged leaves and discard them.

Spinach Being Prepped

Step Three: Wash The Spinach

Wash the fresh spinach and let it drain. Consider using a salad spinner to remove any excess moisture.

Spinnach Being Rinsed

Step Four: Place the Leaves on the Dehydrator Racks

Place the spinach leaves on your dehydrator racks and spread them evenly on the plastic screens in the racks. A single layer of leaves will dry faster than if they are stacked or clumped together.

Spinach Placed on Racks

Step Five: Place Racks in Dehydrator

Place the spinach on the racks inside your dehydrator. I couldn’t use all 9 of my dehydrator trays. I had to space the trays on every other shelf because of the height of the spinach.

Fresh Spinach on Dehydrator Racks

Step Six: Check The Spinach Halfway Through

Put the cover on the dehydrator and then check the spinach flakes every other hour or so to check how “dry” they are.

Spinach Dehydrated Partially

Step Seven: Remove the Dried Spinach Flakes

This batch today took 3 hours to dehydrate. The finished product should be crisp and crumbly. The dehydrating time will vary according to the humidity in the room where you are drying it and the temperature setting. When it’s completely dry, store it in airtight containers after the “conditioning” period (see below about conditioning).

Fully Dehydrated Fresh Spinach

Making the Spinach Powder:

  • You can use a Magic blender to make spinach powder, or even your coffee grinder to do the grinding needed. Add a handful or so of the dehydrated spinach to your blender of choice depending on the size. Use the “pulse” button or start on low at the beginning.
  • Blend the mixture until you get the “powder” you want. Be careful when you remove the lid because you could end up with spinach powder all over you.
  • Store the spinach powder in airtight jars with lids. Be careful if you use your FoodSaver for the powder, it may clog the tubing. I use clamp jars.
Dehydrate Spinach and Make Spinach Powder

How To Condition Your Fruit or Vegetables

If you live where it’s HUMID: “To condition the fruit, take the dried fruit that has cooled and pack it loosely in plastic or glass jars. Seal the containers and let them stand for 7 to 10 days. The excess moisture in some pieces will be absorbed by the drier pieces. Shake the jars daily to separate the pieces and check the moisture condensation.” https://nchfp.uga.edu/how/dry/pack_store.html

Read More of My Articles  Dehydrating Mushrooms

I use to live in the DRY DESERT: I set my fruit and vegetables on my countertop for 5-7 days. Ten days is even better to make sure everything is dry before using your FoodSaver unit.

Dehydrate Spinach To Use In:

  • Smoothies
  • Omelets
  • Lasagna
  • Taco meat
  • Muffins
  • Waffles (yes it’s awesome)
  • Spaghetti Sauce
  • Chili
  • Casseroles
  • Sweet Bread (like banana or pumpkin bread)
  • Homemade Pasta
  • HomemadeTortillas
  • Soups and Stews
  • Spinach Dip
  • Sprinkle on flatbread with olive oil
  • Use as you would other herbs and spices to add flavor to many dishes

Health Benefits Of Spinach:

Spinach leaves are dark leafy greens loaded with nutrients, with very few calories. Popeye the Sailorman was onto something when he would eat his spinach to gain strength and add nutrition to his diet. That cartoon was always so entertaining.

Spinach can improve glucose control in diabetics, helps in lowering cancer risks, and lowers blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Most of the calories are from protein. It’s high in Vitamin A, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and folate (folic acid). As a vegetable, it provides good fiber to aid in digestion.

Studies have shown that eating cooked spinach is the most healthy approach. If cooked, your body can absorb more of the vitamins A, C, and E, proteins, thiamin, calcium, and iron from the spinach. Eating spinach is also good for you since it includes no preservatives.

Remember, never go overboard on any food, including spinach. Because of the content of vitamin K, a clotting agent, be cautious if you’re on blood thinners. If you have issues with your kidneys you are asking for health challenges with too much spinach in your diet. Always do your research and check with your healthcare provider if you have concerns.

5 from 2 votes
Dehydrate Spinach and Make Spinach Powder
How To Dehydrate Spinach and Make Spinach Powder
Prep Time
15 mins
Dehydrating Time
3 hrs
Total Time
3 hrs 15 mins
 
Course: Salad
Cuisine: American
Servings: 10 people
Author: Linda Loosli
Instructions
  1. Set up your dehydrator and set the temperature according to the brand of your dehydrator. I have an Excalibur 9-Tray Dehydrator and it states (125°F) = (51°C)

  2. Pick through the fresh spinach and remove damaged leaves and discard them.

  3. Wash the fresh spinach and let it drain.

  4. Place the spinach leaves on your dehydrator racks and spread them evenly on the plastic screens in the racks.

  5. Place the spinach on the racks inside your dehydrator. I had to space the racks on every other shelf because of the height of the spinach.

  6. Put the cover on the dehydrator and check the spinach every other hour or so to check how "dry" it is. This batch today took 3 hours to dehydrate. The finished product should be crisp and crumbly.

  7. The dehydrating time will vary according to the humidity in the room where you are drying it. When it's completely dry store it in airtight containers after "conditioning" it.

Conditioning The Spinach
  1. If you live where it is HUMID: “To condition the fruit, take the dried fruit that has cooled and pack it loosely in plastic or glass jars. Seal the containers and let them stand for 7 to 10 days. The excess moisture in some pieces will be absorbed by the drier pieces. Shake the jars daily to separate the pieces and check the moisture condensation.” https://nchfp.uga.edu/how/dry/pack_store.html

    I use to live in the DRY DESERT: I set my fruit and vegetables on my countertop for 5-7 days. Ten days is even better to make sure everything is dry before using your FoodSaver unit.

Spinach Powder
  1. You can use a Magic blender to make spinach powder. Add a handful or so of the dehydrated spinach to your blender of choice depending on the size. Use the "pulse" button or start on low at the beginning.

  2. Blend the mixture until you get the "powder" you want. Be careful when you remove the lid because you will have spinach powder all over you.

  3. Store the spinach powder in airtight jars with lids. Be careful if you use your FoodSaver for the powder, it may ruin the tubing. I use clamp jars.

Can I use my kitchen oven to dehydrate my fruits and vegetables?

Yes, many people use their ovens. You do need to be careful and use the lowest temperature setting of hopefully around 170 degrees. If yours doesn’t go that low, set the oven as low as possible and then leave the oven door ajar slightly using a wad of foil. You’ll need to check the product often that is being dried to make sure it doesn’t burn.

Put the food to be dried on a cookie sheet covered with parchment paper. Try to make the product slices fairly thin so they dry out evenly and consistently.

Here Are Other Dehydrating Posts

Final Word

Isn’t it great when you can dehydrate food from your garden? Spinach is so easy to dehydrate and even easier to store in jars! For your picky eaters who don’t like spinach, putting dehydrated spinach in your favorite recipes will be a great solution. I like to make “green smoothies” in the morning for breakfast. Often I’ll use fresh spinach, but I’ll use my dehydrated spinach flakes from time to time. Let me know how you use your dehydrated spinach and spinach powder, I’d like to share your ideas with my readers. May God Bless this world, Linda

 

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16 Comments

    1. Hi Donna (girlfriend) I miss you! I have way too many bags of spinach in my freezer so I tried dehydrating it for flakes and powder. I use kale powder all the time! I love hearing you talk about your tilapia. You rock Nurse Donna! 🙂 Linda

    1. 5 stars
      Thanks for great ideas!!

      ALSO IMPORTANT: ONE way to relieve the pressure and pain of kidney stones is to buy and take Stone Free by Planetary Herbals (supplement). I have found this supplement to be a life saver/back saver at times! It works for gallstones, too!

      Best to all,

      JESS

  1. So many recipes call for taking frozen spinach, thawing it, then making sure it’s as dry as possible. I wondered why not begin with dried spinach? Can anyone tell me if you can dry it in a regular oven? (I don’t own a dehydrator.) I just tried putting “pressed” spinach (which released lots of water) into a skillet on low heat – figured that would dry it out. Pretty sure this works…but still interested in NO water spinach. And, how does dry spinach correlate to using a 10 oz frozen block?

    1. Hi Meri, I have never dehydrated in my conventional oven so I can’t give advice on that one. You can dry your spinach outside on screens covered with another screen to keep the bugs or critters away. One thing I do know is that one pound of fresh spinach (cooks down to 1.5 cups)=10 ounce package of frozen spinach. I use my freeze-dried spinach in my dips all the time. My dehydrated spinach, I have to cook. In other words, spread one pound of fresh spinach on trays or screens and let dry outside. You would need to cook it to come out with the finished product of frozen spinach. I hope this helps, Linda

  2. Another great article Linda. I have an Excalibur also, love it. I put my washed stems on a large clean towel and pat dry with a Bounty paper towel. You are so right about using the Food Saver, I learned the hard way many years back when I was first learning. And eating too much spinach can cause kidney stones. BTW, I would like to see an article about using plastic containers for food storage. Who are using the PETE or HDPE ones? Are we watching the coding on the bottom? I am not talking about the 5 gal. buckets.

    1. Hi Judy, thank you for your kind words, my friend. Oh, I didn’t know eating too much spinach can cause kidney stones!! Thank you for that information!! I hope people are watching the numbers on their buckets, great reminder. I will write a post on that! Great idea, Linda

  3. 5 stars
    Linda: Thanks as always for the greatest tips and ideas on how to live frugally and healthfully! I love seeing all of your lists of how to use dehydrated spinach and then the other lists of things to dehydrate! Well, I guess I am spoiled rotten by the many food co-ops I belong to around here! I can buy dehydrated organic spinach powder, org. tomato powder, etc., etc. straight from our local wholesale Frontier Herbs Buying Club at great prices. That means I don’t have to do all the work and can get the same produce already washed and dehydrated, either as flakes or powder, I believe. Same for organic fruits and nuts from our local Tierra Farm co-op/buying club.
    On the otherhand, if you had a huge crop in your garden to work with for pennies on the dollar, THAT might be worth the extra effort and electricity. And don’t I know about ELECTRICAL BILLS that go up with a Freeze Drier! I would probably not recommend doing Spinach in the freeze drier, cause the cost would be prohibitive (electric bill), though it is great for F-drying many foods that would not work well in a regular dehydrator.
    Sorry, I guess I really AM spoiled out here in Central New York! We have so many organic farmer friends and org. orchardists and even Amish farmer friends who sell their produce pretty cheap, even though it’s grown organically. What we cannot get in the winter, we can get through Azure Standard for slightly higher prices due to the shipping. If you ever get a chance to join Azure Standard, I highly recommend it. Not everything is cheaper, but a LOT of things are, especially if you are able to buy in bulk or split a bulk item with friends or relatives. I feel sorry for our kids that moved to Northern NJ in December, because they are having to pay $10 for 18 eggs now. I can get them from our friends for $2/dozen, so the equivalent of $3.00 for 18 eggs! What a difference!! They mostly sell them to us at that price because we are dear friends, though!

    1. Hi Jess, thank you for the 5 stars, my sweet friend! Oh, I would love to have all those organic items already processed and ready to use. Our electric bills in Southern Utah were really high, here in Northern Utah they are about half the cost. Yes, we have Azure Standard here, they are awesome to work with and buy in bulk. Your friends have eggs for you for a great price!! I love this! Linda

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