How To Be Prepared To Feed Families After A Natural Disaster

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Are you prepared? If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you are, or you’re at least trying to be prepared. Can you feed families who have not prepared for a natural disaster? I feel I am over the top prepared, according to some people. I don’t really care for the word survivalist. It’s not me, but I am prepared for the unexpected. I was a prepper before the word became popular. It’s a way of life for me and I know it is for so many of you as well. I applaud you, and you know it! I love hearing from you that you are doing what you can to be prepared for a natural disaster or whatever comes your way.

Somedays, I wonder if we can feed families that have maybe only one or two days worth of food in their pantry. I’m aware families have been told by a few churches, and government agencies to store food for emergencies. I have been at luncheons and I will casually ask people sitting at my table, “Have you thought about storing food and water for emergencies?” Some people have said, “I can’t afford to buy any extra food or water to store.”

Feed Families-Church Food Assistance

I have also heard someone say they were in a church food assistance program and said they have to throw out the excess cans of tuna they were given because they can only eat so much tuna. Oh, yes, I was in shock, I couldn’t say anything. I had to pick my jaw up off the floor. Well, you know what I mean. I was shocked and disappointed that they didn’t think to save those cans for an emergency or give the cans to others in need. At some point, food handouts will stop, right?

Feed Families-Church Serves Food

feed families

There is a wonderful church (not this picture) in Southern Utah that serves food to families in need every Sunday from donations they receive from local grocery stores, other churches and out of their own pocket. The pastor told me once “This may be the only meal these people get all week.” I have seen him and his family at Costco piling up food for their Sunday meals. It’s humbling and a blessing to all those involved.

Read More of My Articles  Emergency Preparedness Holiday Gifts Everyone Needs

Feed Families-Where To Start

  1. We need to teach our families to be self-reliant and not depend on other people or family members unless they have no other choice (stop entitlement).
  2. Our families must feed, clothe, and hydrate themselves without government assistant (stop entitlement).
  3. Every family should jot down what they eat each week and throw another can of food in the grocery basket each time they shop.
  4. All families should have a plan as to how much food they need to store for emergencies. This will help you: Food Storage by Linda
  5. Please store water to hydrate your family. I suggest 4-gallons per person per day. Please don’t put yourself and your family in a position that you have to stand in lines after a disaster at the county buildings, prepare today, not tomorrow.
  6. You can count on riots shortly after we have a disaster, people get mean when they are hungry and thirsty. Let’s get real here and do our part to be prepared. Think about how many people live in your community and how many of those people can be housed, clothed and fed if there is a true emergency.
  7. It would be very hard for me to turn away hungry people, BUT they have known for years to be prepared. Who is listening?
  8. Please do not use the excuse that you can’t afford to store food storage. You can’t afford NOT to store food storage, or store water. Period. There are cheap foods, for instance, pasta, beans, rice, canned vegetables and canned fruits.
  9. Grow a garden, learn from neighbors how to get started, or visit your local garden nurseries. The food you grow someday may be the only food you have to eat. Learn to dehydrate food when it’s on sale or from your garden. Visit your local farmer’s markets when foods are in their harvest season and producing healthy bounties.
  10. Visit your local State Extension service since they will teach you the safe ways to preserve your food, whether by dehydrating, water bath, or pressure canning. Please be safe in your preservation methods. I see so many dangerous canning ideas on the internet. Four Foods Not Safe To Can by Linda
  11. Learn how to cook from scratch to stretch your grocery budget. Buy the basics and learn how to use them: What You Need In Your Pantry by Linda
  12. Learn to make bread, biscuits, tortillas, and crackers, it will save your life and your budget. Borrow your grandma’s cookbooks or recipe cards. We all need to know how to make the items listed above. Plan a get-together and share your cooking skills. You and those you invite will need them sooner than you think. Trust me on this one.
  13. Invest in a good soup pot. You can make so many good soups with beans, rice, pasta or vegetables. Soup Pot or Dutch Oven
  14. Be prepared to cook without electricity or your gas stove after an unexpected natural disaster. If we have a gas leak we will have to turn off our gas lines. Invest in a Butane Stove and Butane Fuel or an outside Dutch Oven with briquettes. This way you can at least make a pot of soup or boil water.
Read More of My Articles  Why I Store Lysol Disinfecting Wipes

I hope you realize, and I know so many of you do understand, the urgency at hand to be able to feed families that are not prepared at all. Many of us can feed our family, but how can we teach people that they need to stop depending on help from others, including the government.

Copyright Pictures:

Church: AdobeStock_184629638 by Bettys4240

Rice/Beans: AdobeStock_43398560 by Angela Schmidt

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22 thoughts on “How To Be Prepared To Feed Families After A Natural Disaster

  • January 28, 2018 at 9:23 am
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    Years ago, I stumbled across a book called “HowI Feed My Family on $16 a Week (And Have Meat, Fish, or Poultry on the Table Every Night”.  It taught me a lot on budgeting and how to cook when you have no money to spare.  Thing is, even Mrs. York (the author of the above book) was able to set aside a dollar a week for an extra can of food.  And the thought that someone would throw out canned food drives me nuts.  The majority of food is “best before”, not “bad after”, and common sense will tell you if the milk is sour.  I don’t have a big pantry, but I grew up in a house where you always had a little extra.  I’d love it if someone would do a post on depression era meals.  I’ve made some I’ve found online, and they aren’t too bad.

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    • January 28, 2018 at 2:59 pm
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      Hi Susan, I love love love your comment! Yes, we can tell if the milk is sour! I did a list of depression meals, but they are ones I grew up on. My mom was a single mom with three kids. If we can teach those that do not know how to cook from scratch, we will accomplish so much. My slogan in my mind is “it’s all about the numbers.” It’s money, it’s grocery, it’s how many kids can I feed, how to stretch a meal and can I afford this house. I grew up with so little, I’m very frugal and I still try to cut expenses every day. https://www.foodstoragemoms.com/2015/02/great-depression-meals/#more-34780 Have a great day! Linda

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    • January 29, 2018 at 1:47 pm
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      Yes you are right on and I agree with you 100% I have always picked up extras when at the grocery store and cooking from scratch was the way I was raised. So thank you for you input.

      Reply
  • January 28, 2018 at 10:12 am
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    great article. I have been canning vegetable soup this week. I just got another box of different fruits and veggies from BountifulBaskets.org . I plan to dehydrate some cabbage today. I have some yellow squash, eggplant,cabbage,roma tomatoes,jalapeno peppers,bell peppers,asparagus,celery and onions . I also have oranges,pineapples,apples, pears,lemons,limes and bananas. The pineapple corer-slicer I have makes some thick slices. I am not sure if I should try to dehydrate them or just eat them. My DIL’s step mother just got out of the hospital, so we gave them some of my canned hamburger stew,canned chicken stew,canned vegetable soup and canned beets so they wouldn’t have to do a lot of cooking this weekend. I enjoy canning , it’s a lot of work, but it’s always worth the effort when you hear those lids seal. I am teaching my 14 &12 year old grand daughters how to can. And the 15 month old is always close by watching (she likes to hold the measuring cups I’m not using)LOL. Have a blessed week ,and keep on prepping.

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    • January 28, 2018 at 3:13 pm
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      Hi Judy, I can picture those grandkids learning to can with you, precious skills they will use for a lifetime. The bay and the measuring cup, I love it! Isn’t it wonderful you are able to preserve food and share your bounty with those in need (hospital)! You rock, girlfriend! Good job, Linda

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    • January 29, 2018 at 11:04 am
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      Judy P, I have done some canning but I would love to have your recipes for the soups you mentioned. The ingredients and if you cook your meat at all before putting into jars or raw. I would love to can some soups. I have canned chicken, broths, ground hamburger in tomato juice, salsa, potatoes, things like that but not soups.

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      • January 29, 2018 at 12:23 pm
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        Hi, yes I do cook my meat first.I use a simple broth, either chicken or beef, and season to taste ( don’t over salt) ,place about 1 cup cooked meat in the canning jar, followed by your choice of veggies ,(raw) I like to dice some carrots ,onion,potatoes,celery, if doing beef.(I used cooked ground beef)optional add some tomato juice or diced tomato or rotel type tomatoes. add enough broth to cover veggies leaving about 3333 1 inch head space. Process at 10 pounds of pressure for 90 minutes (quarts).

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    • January 29, 2018 at 1:51 pm
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      I just canned some potato leek soup (without the milk /flour ) I had some leeks that I had chopped from last week when I made soup and I didn’t want them to go bad so I canned them with my cubed potatoes and they look great on my food storage shelf Yummy I love this soup.

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      • January 29, 2018 at 4:08 pm
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        Hi Debbie, AWESOME! I love making soups, glad you left the milk and flour out! Linda

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  • January 28, 2018 at 12:20 pm
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    Amen, Linda. Give a man a fish…………

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    • January 28, 2018 at 3:10 pm
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      Hi Debbie, you nailed it! I forgot to add the fish story!! God bless you for reminding me!!! Hugs, Linda (Teach a man to fish and you teach him to feed himself for a lifetime)

      Reply
  • January 28, 2018 at 11:41 pm
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    Linda – Great post.
    We had a wake up call yesterday. Our power was out for 7 hours. Reason unknown!

    I was away from my apartment for the first 2 hours of the outage but the electric company did not have an ETA for restoration. When I got home, one neighbor said all she had was lukewarm water from the tap (water still works but not the electric water heaters). I said I was sorry but that I would have my camp stove up and running in a few minutes. I offered for her to bring her pot of water and heat it on my stove as well as heat food if needed. She did not take me up on it.

    SO…when my stove was up and running (took me longer to find the butane canisters!!), I made a BIG bowl of popcorn – figured if I was going to sit around reading my Kindle, I wanted something good to munch on! Buttered popcorn is my go-to snack. I also made a nice cup of tea! Later, I cooked (heated) a can of chili for my dinner.

    While I am willing and able to share some of what I have stored, I have to say that I don’t feel too sorry for those who did not listen when I gave a couple of prepping talks. They only gave me pushback saying I was just fear-mongering and that they would just come to my apartment to stay warm and eat. I was not put to the test this time around but I say, “Enjoy your PBJ while I enjoy hot soup/chili/scrambled eggs or other hot filling nourishing food.

    Leanne

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    • January 29, 2018 at 7:32 am
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      Hi, Leanne, hey that was a good trial run, seven hours!! I can tell that you are prepared and I love that!! I also sensed you were not stressed about the power outage. LOL! I know you had to find the butane canisters but YOU knew you were prepared and they were in your home. Hooray!! You rock! I love hearing you were prepared to make buttered popcorn, I can almost smell it! Yummy! Oh, and you had chili to cook, see we don’t need that much to survive without power. Now, if we can get everyone on board to store fuel, food, and water, etc. I gave my last prepping talk in September to large groups. Stay safe, stay well, and keep on prepping. Linda

      Reply
  • January 29, 2018 at 10:07 am
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    I love the church that helps feed others in need. Any way we can donate if we’re not in the St. George area?? Thanks!

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    • January 29, 2018 at 12:09 pm
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      Hi Sydnee, I have contacted him, Jimi Kestin via text message to get the information. He works at a bank during the day but I will get the information for you. I remember once hearing they can always use paper products. I know his wife mentioned they have a church building now with a bigger kitchen and it’s been a blessing to them. I will get back to you! May God bless you, Linda

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    • January 29, 2018 at 12:33 pm
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      Hi Sydnee, I heard from him, he said to contact him directly via his cell number: Jimi Kestin 435-669-9070 Thanks again, Linda

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  • January 29, 2018 at 12:40 pm
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    I can’t believe the church didn’t think to give the tuna away either. I have some home canned applesauce that a family member likes, I gave her lots of them, since I got carried away with canning.

    There is a lot of flu in this area, and we have been staying home to keep us from getting it. Food isn’t a problem.

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    • January 29, 2018 at 3:59 pm
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      HI, Janet, I don’t think she told her church about the tuna. I just heard it at a church meeting. I love hearing getting carried away with canning applesauce, I love that! Be safe, stay well, be careful around crowds. I’m staying home as much as possible too! Linda

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  • February 8, 2018 at 11:46 am
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    I agree with much of your post except the part about (stop entitlement)..some of these folks are on fixed incomes, elderly, or a mom trying to raise her children after daddy runs away. So entitlement is such a strong word and sheds the wrong kind of light on a problem that some folks have little control over. 🙂

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    • February 8, 2018 at 11:58 am
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      Hi Pamela, I totally agree with you on fixed incomes and single parents. I live where families abuse it by hiding income they make from the government and family members having kids they really can’t afford to take care of on their own income. They expect others to buy them groceries and clothe the kids. I have never lived where this fraud is taking place using our tax dollars in government low-income housing and food stamp program. I am not talking about honest working people. I am talking about those that expect to be taken care of or lie about their income for years and I mean years. It’s a way of life for them. It’s a bad example they are teaching their kids. It’s an outright crime. Thanks for your comment, now you know why I posted what I did. Linda

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      • February 8, 2018 at 2:27 pm
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        Hello Linda, I see where you are coming from now. I have not seen it first hand of the one’s hiding their income to stay on assistance, but I have seen the single parents and elderly in my hometown suffer. We help them when we can at the church and our community center and they are progressing well. It is a shame that people have children they cannot afford or lie about how they make a living. Here’s hoping we all prepare for ourselves and try to have some left for others. I enjoy your blog, thank you. Pamela

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        • February 8, 2018 at 2:57 pm
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          Hi Pamela, I’m hoping others understand what I was trying to get across. One of my daughters was left with four kids to raise without any child support. I get both sides. I love hearing you have such a wonderful community that helps each other. May God bless all of you in your work! Thank you my friend, Linda

          Reply

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