Honey-25 Reasons Why You Need To Buy And Store Honey

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Today I am sharing why I have at least 25 reasons why I buy and store honey. It’s that time of year for me and many other people that suffer from allergies. My dog, Boston scratches like crazy this time of the year as well. I called the veterinarian to see what I could give Boston, they said Benadryl (1/2 tablet-per his weight) and/or a small dose of raw honey. BUT only honey harvested from where we live. This is for allergy purposes, therefore the pollen in the air would be similar to what is in the honey. I am not a doctor or in the medical field but I like to be aware of natural remedies.

From left to right, the pictures above show creamed clover honey, raw honey, regular clover honey and a smaller container of clover honey (Cox’s Honey is my favorite brand)! Listed below are suggested benefits of honey found in various magazine articles, newspapers and media outlets.

25 Reasons To Store Honey:

1. help cure or alleviate allergy symptoms

2. good for memory-Alzheimer’s

3. good for our immune system

4. helps with sleep and sleep apnea (helps with the dry throat feeling while using a CPAP)

5. take one tablespoon before bed and you might have a better nights sleep

6. your cholesterol will improve

7. your triglycerides can go down

8. helps with depression

9. honey helps with the highs and lows of Diabetes blood sugar levels-helping to stabilize glucose levels

10. health of your gut

11. melatonin and the mind

12. reproductive processes/infertility

13. menopause issues

14. thyroid conditions

15. slows down the aging process

16. overall better health

17. good fuel for exercise

18. easy to cook with

19. stores very well

20. good sweetener substitute

21. it’s good for your heart

22. healing wounds/cuts

23. helps heal burns

24. helps alleviate a cough

25. a spoonful a day keeps free radicals away….

Remember to always do your own research. I am storing honey because I can see how it would help my family in almost every situation in life. Every day or emergency situations, it could come in handy.

My awesome friend, Rochelle talks all about honey:

HI! I’m excited to be doing a guest blog post! My name is Rochelle Allen and I grew up as a beekeepers daughter in Shelley, Idaho.  My paternal grandpa, Orville S. Cox, actually was the one that started the business which is known today as Cox’s Honey Farms Inc.  He started as a hobbyist and it just took off from there.  His kids, Roy (my daddio), and Merrill were the two that wanted to follow in his footsteps.

As a child, I got to ride out to the bee yards with my dad and wear a bee suit.  I helped by “smoking” the bees.  This makes them actually thirsty, so they retreat into the hive to drink and it has a calming effect.  A bee smoker is actually filled with dried vegetation and dried manure and a hot coal…not exactly perfume smelling, but it creates enough smoke to get the job done.  As I grew up, I got to help out more with the extraction of the honey.

Creamed Honey

This is done with a giant spinner and its hard to explain, but VERY fun to watch.  I also got to help out with the bottling process as a kid.  Our creamed honey bottling is time-consuming, but it gave a good chance to talk to family and learn more about the business.  As kids, we took turns on who did what when it came to packaging.  We needed to glue the cases, put the bottles inside, and then stack the boxes up. We turned it into a fun game.
Now, that I’m grown, I use honey to cook with all the time. It makes the best FOODS! I also am the Cox’s Honey vendor to our local Walmart stores.  Our company has been in WalMart for about 15 years now and uses vendors as the supplier to the store.  We just have a few vendors, but enough to get the Utah stores serviced. I love my little side job of taking the honey into the stores and seeing how empty the shelves are every week.  Well, enough about me! I thought I’d answer some frequently asked questions about our honey in general…

Q: Is our honey pasteurized? Heated? Is it raw?  Here are the answers:

A: Pasteurizing is used to kill bacteria in milk. Bacteria do not live in honey! We flash heat our honey so it will flow through the gravity strainers which allow the food value containing pollen grains to pass through with the honey, keeping the nutrients and allowing the foreign items to be strained out. It also may delay granulation for about a year. Doing the flash heating and quickly cooling it down makes a minimal effect on the natural qualities of honey. Honey and heat are worst of enemies, cold and honey are best friends because it is a time temperature situation. Honey stored at 100 degrees for months is damaged much more than heating to 140 degrees for a few minutes. Flash heating exposes the honey to heat for a minimal time, keeping the good flavor and quality very high. Comb honey is totally natural and does not need to be strained as the bees seal it with wax to keep dust etc. out. Creamed honey is less time with heat so it requires larger openings on the containers filled with it. Cooling is quicker and for a longer period of time than liquid.

Q: Is your honey raw? Organic? Processed?

A: Our answer for raw honey is YES! Comb honey is the most natural, then creamed as it is a cold temperature packaging whereas liquid is packaged warm, both are still raw because it is only gravity strained instead of force filtered, allowing the pollen grains to remain with the honey. Organic–we do not add or take anything away from the honey, where the bees are over a wide range of territory, we may not be able to fit in the organic definition due to we cannot control where they fly to, we need a definition of organic, but our guess is we are as organic as possible. Even the comb honey is packaged, is that defined as processing. Our honey is as natural as it can possibly be in all the forms we package it in. Nothing is added and nothing is taken away which is about as natural as you can get!

Q: What is creamed honey? How do you store it?

Creamed begins as granulated seed honey that is drained into a mill tank that whips it as it drains into the tank. It comes out in a thicker, white color. Nothing is added. Nothing is taken away. It is great on scones, toast, PBH, etc. Best if kept at around 70º or cooler. Keep in the coolest part of the house. When the heat comes, I actually freeze most of the creamed containers and have one in the fridge thawed and one in the cupboard. I then rotate them as I use them-fridge to the cupboard, freezer to fridge. The creamed will separate and darken in color if exposed to heat for long periods of time. The nutritional value is the same, just doesn’t look as pretty! I like using it in my meat recipes. The taste is out of this world!
Thanks so much Rochelle for sharing this great information with my readers! This is my favorite honey too!

27 thoughts on “Honey-25 Reasons Why You Need To Buy And Store Honey

  • October 9, 2013 at 9:25 am
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    First, Foremost and Most Importantly, honey does NOT help in any way with sleep apnea.
    Honey may help sooth throat and mouth dryness other than that it is Not a way to treat, cure or manage sleep apnea

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    • October 9, 2013 at 9:26 am
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      Spelling correction needed. Registered Respiratory Therapist

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    • October 9, 2013 at 12:50 pm
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      I am so glad you brought this to our attention because the statement does not imply that it helps with sleep apnea. It helps with the dry throat because my friends and son-in-law have told me this. I did a whole CPAP post and a YouTube showing how to use a CPAP with a solar generator. I am very aware of sleep apnea issues. I will add that to my statement to clarify that. Thanks so much!

      Reply
  • October 9, 2013 at 5:58 pm
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    I loved reading all of the benefits of honey! Thanks for taking the time to post this info 🙂 Pinned while I was here tonight too!

    Shauna @ The Best Blog Recipes

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    • October 9, 2013 at 9:34 pm
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      Hi Shauna, I have a few books on the benefits of honey…I think I am going to get one for my Giveaway of 12 of my favorite things! Hugs! Linda

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  • October 9, 2013 at 7:26 pm
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    Who would have thought that honey would be such a benefit. I knew it helped for sore throats, but after looking at the list–wow! Thanks for sharing! –Deb (DialMforMoms)

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    • October 9, 2013 at 9:35 pm
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      Deb, I have been reading so much about honey…I have a few books about all the health benefits…I might try doing some beehives…if I can talk my husband into it! LOL! Hugs! Linda

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  • October 9, 2013 at 8:00 pm
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    Thanks for the information on Honey. Would be good to put some in my storage. Liked the idea of giving it to the dogs for itching too. Will try a small amount with my min pin and see if it helps.

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    • October 9, 2013 at 9:36 pm
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      Hi Lauralee, I just ordered another shipment of honey….it keeps going up in price! I really want some beehives. Hmmm…Hugs! Linda

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  • October 9, 2013 at 8:39 pm
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    Neat!! I just might try a spoonful tonight to help me fall asleep!

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    • October 9, 2013 at 9:38 pm
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      Hi Gabrielle, I would give it a try. I told my husband the other day that I thought my allergies were not as bad and wondered if it is the honey…It’s worth a try! Linda

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  • October 10, 2013 at 6:10 pm
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    I remember my mom telling me I should by Ohio honey to help with my allergies. But I had no idea about the other things honey will help with. I have thyroid problems, I will start taking some honey everyday.

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    • October 10, 2013 at 6:16 pm
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      Hi Heather, I had no idea until I started researching natural healers and honey is at the top of the list! Just make sure you buy your honey from a reputable place. Some are not “really” honey. I do not care for raw honey but that is just me. Glad you stopped by! Hugs! Linda

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  • October 11, 2013 at 5:04 am
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    Try sourwood honey from Georgia/North Carolina area and basswood or lyn honey from West Virginia. Two of my favorites. Suppliers can be found on the internet. I also like acacia honey from Europe.

    Honey will store for just about forever.

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    • October 11, 2013 at 11:19 am
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      Barry, my friend was telling me all the different honeys I could buy…but you have some I have never heard of before! I have got to check these out! Thanks so much for letting me know about these!!!! Linda

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  • October 20, 2013 at 7:07 am
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    Raw honey is an amazing food! We use it regularly and include it in our food storage as well.

    I noticed, though, in your article you didn’t caution readers regarding the source of their honey. Recent news articles have made it apparent that much of what is sold as honey is really ultra filtered products with nearly all pollen removed and high fructose corn syrup added. Here are just a few source articles –

    https://www.foodrenegade.com/your-honey-isnt-honey/

    https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/11/tests-show-most-store-honey-isnt-honey/#.UmPVinjh-xQ

    For true honey, it’s usually best to purchase raw honey from reputable apiaries. I’m partial to local raw honey because it does help with allergies and I can get to know my supplier.

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    • October 21, 2013 at 1:20 pm
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      Kari, I am so glad you brought this up! I will contact this group to see if I can use their link and add it to my honey post! Linda

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  • February 23, 2015 at 8:29 am
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    Thanks Linda for these fine points on why having honey in your pantry. I’m in Iowa where we have local honey produced here. When our local farmers market is underway I always stop by to pick up some raw honey, bee pollen (which is loaded with all the Natural Vitamin B’s 1-12 needed to boost one’s immunity to fight off viruses) and raw beeswax to make my natural healing ointments and creams. Raw honey can crystallize but put the jar in a small pan of warm water to liquify it again.

    Thanks so much for your great informative posts!

    Reply
    • February 23, 2015 at 9:23 am
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      Hi Kristi, you are so lucky to live so close to local honey beekeepers. Thanks for your great tip on the natural healing ointment. Linda

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  • February 23, 2015 at 11:14 am
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    i have always stored honey in my years supply. It has been a learning experience for me because growing up we never had it to eat except from a little bear on pancakes. I have tried to use it in recipes, but not always with the best results. Now when I eat it on toast or rolls I seem to have a reaction that makes me shake and have headache. Why with something so pure and good for you would such reactions come ? My husband loves it and so of course we always have it on hand.

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    • February 23, 2015 at 11:28 am
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      Hi Laurie, that is scary you are having those reactions to honey. I recently learned that some honey is not pure honey. It contains High fructose sugar. YIKES! It not honey in some cases. Try buying some from a honey farmer. I only buy mine from Cox’s honey. It is real pure raw honey. Nothing artificial in it. I hope you don’t have to give up honey. Are you a diabetic? Linda

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  • February 23, 2015 at 11:45 am
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    No, I’m not diabetic. I wonder if there are reactions with certain medications ? I appreciate the info you post for all of us. We live in southeastern Utah and there are some very good hives around here and that’s where we buy honey. But, I may ask about their operation to see if there might be something causing an allergic reaction.

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    • February 23, 2015 at 6:44 pm
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      Hi Laurie, I think I would ask about the honey. Maybe its the medications, ask the pharmacy. Also, I wonder what kind of flowers the bees are getting their nectar from. LOL! Is that whats its called? I am not a beekeeper! I wonder if you are allergic to the flowers where the bees are fetching the nectar. The headache and shaking really concerns me. You are for sure having a reaction. Let me know if you find out anything. I love learning about this kind of thing! Blessings, Linda

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  • February 23, 2015 at 12:47 pm
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    Try to get a taste of the honey before you buy a big batch, there are a lot of different flavours and some are quite strong. Manuka honey is supposed to be better for medicinal purposes and buckwheat honey is really strong tasting. Clover is a nice, mild taste.

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    • February 23, 2015 at 6:46 pm
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      Hi Alice, I am very fussy about my honey. Good idea about trying some before you buy a big batch. I only buy mine from Cox’s honey. Buckwheat honey, I don’t think I would like that one! I like my honey a little mellow…Linda

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  • February 24, 2015 at 9:50 am
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    As a beekeeper, I would heartily echo the attributes of this amazing food. It is really important to try to obtain local honey, especially if you are taking for allergies. The local honey will have the nectar from flowers growing in your area. Before becoming a beekeeper, I used to store large containers of honey from the warehouse stores. Now after learning more, I would never use that honey. It is very likely to contain antibiotics and chemicals and is blended and highly processed–much comes from other countries. All of this tends to remove much of the benefit. Sure, it’s cheaper, but there’s a reason. Like with produce and so much else. it’s best to try to obtain locally if possible. Thanks for pointing out what a good storage item honey is–it does keep practically forever! And don’t begrudge your local beekeeper’s price…producing honey especially for the smaller beekeeper is hard work, as is caring for the bees!

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    • February 24, 2015 at 10:19 am
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      Hi Norma, thanks for this comment! I am adding it to my website! Thank you from the bottom of my heart! Linda

      Reply

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