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20 Ways to Manage Pain Naturally Without Seeing a Doctor

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Living with pain can be a challenging experience, and seeking relief often involves a trip to the doctor. However, there are several natural methods you can explore before resorting to medical intervention or the use of a prescription drug. These strategies include various aspects of lifestyle, nutrition, and alternative therapies to empower you on your journey towards pain relief.

Please keep in mind, that I’m not a doctor, nurse, or anyone in the medical field. Here’s the deal, please talk to your medical professional to be sure what is safe for you to try. I’m writing this article in hopes someone may use some of this information if and when they have pain issues.

There may be times when we have a power grid outage or other emergency making a doctor’s visit a real challenge. If we are already applying the use of natural pain relievers we are better prepared to treat ourselves and family members when healthcare professionals aren’t available.

20 Ways to Manage Pain Naturally Without Seeing a Doctor

1. Mind-Body Techniques

Incorporating mind-body techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, and progressive muscle relaxation. These techniques can help alleviate pain by promoting relaxation and reducing stress, which are known contributors to pain. Relaxation Techniques for Preppers

2. Acupuncture

This ancient Chinese practice involves inserting thin needles into specific points on the body to stimulate energy flow. Acupuncture may be effective in managing various types of pain, including chronic conditions. I have a neighbor (I have never met her) who does acupuncture. Mark and I have personally never tried it.

3. Heat and Cold Therapy

Applying heat or cold to the affected area can relieve pain and reduce inflammation. Warm compresses or heating pads are great for muscle pain, while an ice pack or cold compress works well for some acute injuries. Hot Water Bottles (thank you, Leanne) or Heating Pads.

Be careful not to apply treatments that are too hot or too cold such that you damage your skin. You want natural pain relief to help, not add to the problem.

4. Exercise

Regular physical activity helps release endorphins, the body’s natural painkillers. Low-impact exercises like swimming, walking, or yoga can be particularly beneficial for managing chronic pain. Fitness for Survival

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The physical discipline of tai chi has been shown to benefit people with various physical challenges like rheumatoid arthritis, tension headaches, fibromyalgia, and osteoarthritis. Consider taking a tai chi class to see if you find relief from some of your stiffness and pain.

You need to approach these activities in moderation to start. You don’t want to aggravate things like lower back pain by doing things that can cause additional damage.

5. Herbal Remedies

Some herbs, like turmeric, ginger, and willow bark, have anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Rosemary oil has been used for mild pain relief. Frankincense oil has muscle-relaxing properties which help reduce tension and related muscle pain. It also helps increase blood flow which can reduce muscle and joint pain in stiff joints.

Cloves have been used for many years as natural remedies to numb the skin and provide temporary relief for toothache. The common approach is to use clove oil. Like clove oil, peppermint oil is a natural remedy that may help reduce pain. Often used as a topical application for skin issues, but also for headache, joint pain, and itching. Likewise, it’s also been used as a pain medication through aromatherapy to reduce stress and improve mental function.

Incorporating these herbs and spices into your diet or taking them as supplements may help reduce pain. The Best Herbal Plants to Grow for Homemade Tea

6. Massage Therapy

Professional massage or self-massage with techniques like trigger point therapy can help relax muscles, improve circulation, and reduce pain associated with tension and stress. Some physical ailments may require professional help with physical therapy or chiropractic treatments. So be cautious as you implement certain treatments since there may be some unwanted side effects if not applied properly.

7. Hydration

Staying adequately hydrated is essential for overall health and can contribute to pain relief. Water helps flush out toxins, supports joint function, and keeps the body functioning optimally. 35 OTC Medications You Should Store

If you notice, during many athletic events on TV, the active participants are drinking plenty of water to prevent cramping and related muscle pain. It also helps to keep stomach function and digestion working as designed and reduces the chance of constipation.

8. Maintain a Healthy Diet

A well-balanced diet focusing on anti-inflammatory foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and omega-3 fatty acids, can help manage pain associated with conditions like arthritis. 20 Healthy Habits for Emergency Preppers

Natural foods are certainly a great option rather than having to rely on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to fight inflammation and pain. Natural foods should provide the nutrients you need, and reduce the chance of ulcers that sometimes accompany over-the-counter remedies.

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9. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

CBT can be a valuable tool for managing chronic pain by helping individuals change negative thought patterns and develop coping strategies to improve their overall well-being.

10. Yoga and Stretching

Practicing yoga or incorporating regular stretching exercises can improve flexibility, reduce muscle tension, and enhance overall body awareness, contributing to pain relief.

11. Capsaicin Cream

Derived from chili peppers, capsaicin cream can be applied topically to relieve pain by inhibiting the transmission of pain signals. It is particularly effective for conditions like arthritis. Capsaicin Cream

12. Turmeric and Curcumin Supplements

Turmeric contains curcumin, a natural anti-inflammatory compound. Taking turmeric or curcumin supplements may help reduce pain and inflammation associated with various conditions. Here again, please check with your medical professional before taking any supplements.

13. Chiropractic Care

Chiropractic adjustments can be beneficial for certain types of pain, especially back and neck pain. A qualified chiropractor can help realign the spine and alleviate pressure on nerves.

14. Breathing Exercises

Practicing specific breathing exercises, such as diaphragmatic breathing, can promote relaxation and reduce tension, providing relief for various types of pain.

15. Mindfulness and Guided Imagery

Mindfulness techniques and guided imagery can redirect your focus away from pain, promoting calm and helping manage discomfort.

16. Topical Arnica Gel

Arnica, a natural herb, has anti-inflammatory properties. Applying arnica gel topically may help reduce pain and swelling associated with injuries and muscle soreness. Types of Medicines You Need for a First Aid Kit Topical Arnica Gel

17. Stay Socially Connected

Maintaining social connections can have a positive impact on mental well-being, which, in turn, can contribute to pain management. Social support provides emotional comfort and distraction from pain. Thriving with Less: How to Get By With Less

18. Quercetin-Rich Foods

Quercetin is a flavonoid with anti-inflammatory properties found in foods like apples, onions, and berries. Including these foods in your diet may help manage pain associated with inflammation. Dehydrating Blueberries and Make Blueberry Powder

19. Lavender Tea for Relaxation

Lavender tea contains compounds that promote relaxation and may have mild pain-relieving effects. Drinking a cup of lavender tea before bedtime can contribute to a restful sleep, aiding in pain management. Lavender: Everything You Need to Know

20. Aromatherapy

As mentioned above, essential oils, such as lavender, peppermint, and eucalyptus, can be used in aromatherapy to promote relaxation and alleviate pain. Diffusers or topical applications are common methods of use. 21 Essential Oils Everyone Should Stock Up On

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Final Word

While these natural strategies can be effective in managing pain, it’s crucial to listen to your body and consult with a healthcare professional if your pain persists or worsens. Every individual is unique, and what works for one person may not work for another. Remember, the key is to find a combination of techniques that work best for you, providing a personalized and sustainable approach to pain relief. May God Bless this World, Linda

Copyright Images: Young Couple Jogging Depositphotos_313326338_S by .shock, Fitness Equipment and Healthy Food Depositphotos_70346571_S by Elmirex2009

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8 Comments

  1. Wonderful post, Linda.

    I must say that I have tried nearly everything on this post at one time or another. I have chronic pain and have suffered many years.

    SO, if there is a loss of power, it is really important to have at our fingertips ways to relieve the stress which is also a major cause of pain!

    You mention heating pads and I just want to remind everyone to get hot water bottles – perhaps 2-3!! You could put water and really small ice cubes or snow in one for an ice pack (not as good as a frozen one but…) and of course, very hot (not boiling) water in another. I swear by them and always take one camping with me to heat my sleeping bag before going to bed.

    I also swear by acupuncture. The needles did not cause any pain for me but some might have some mild discomfort. It is a great way to get those nerves to relax!

    Massage is great as well. My daughter is a licensed massage therapist so I can get a massage as often as I want. However, I think sometimes that she takes all of her angst with me when she does massage me! She will often say things like Does that hurt Mom??? and of course, it does to some extent. But if you have muscle spasms which are very painful, massage can relieve those. Just be sure to drink a LOT of water afterwards. You could also ask the massage therapist for some techniques to use in between massages. I have a few that my daughter taught me.

    I would also suggest having a tennis ball handy – if you have back pain, stand at a wall or door with the ball where you have back pain (as long as you know it is not due to an injury that would require medical attention) and sort of move around with the ball massaging the area.

    A TENS unit is also of benefit for painful muscle spasms. You can generally purchase one at a pharmacy like Walgreens. Handy to have.

    1. HI Leanne, oh my gosh, your daughter is a massage therapist? WOOHOO! I would love that! Have you heard of alfalfa for pain. I was talking to my best friend and it helps her Sciata. I think we are going to have to know every possible natural remedy sooner than later. Thanks again for mentioning the hot water bottles, you are the reason I bought one. I had one growing up, they work wonders. You’re the best! Linda

  2. Thanks for this very helpful article, Linda. My doctors just want to prescribe pills, pills, pills–regardless of side effects. I know it’s easier for them, but I refuse. Many of the techniques you listed have worked well for me, so I’m looking forward to trying them all!

    1. Hi Roxanne, thank you for your kind words. I have severe arthritis, I’ve had it since I was very young. I was prescribed various arthritis prescriptions, I never took them. My Rheumatologist suggested I keep my self busy because it would help distract me from the pain. Right or wrong it has worked for me. I cannot just lay in bed or the arthritis becomes worse. Certain foods aggravate it. It’s inflammation, I have to work hard and be conscious of everything. But it works most days. I’m like you the side effects of some prescriptions are not acceptable to me. I watch some TV commercials about various prescriptions they recommend followed by side effects. I think to myself who is going to take the risk? Linda

  3. I have sciatica – the piriformis muscle in my back. I swear by that tennis ball method! That’s the only thing that helps. It’s one of those situations – “It hurts so good!”

    Advil has always been my best friend…until now! I’ve developed Chronic Kidney Disease, Stage 3, and along with a long history of kidney stones shredding my kidneys, that Advil did me in. Can’t ever take it or Aleve again. Tylenol does in the liver. Either one is gonna get ya!

    1. HI Robbie, those are two of the ones I take. They keep checking my kidneys, so far so good. But my Glaucoma surgeries are pushing me. Getting older is not fun, no one warned us. Now we know why! LOL! We go to dinner everyone talks about what aches and pains they have. LOL! Who knew? LOL! It’s so frustrating! Linda

  4. I realize most treatments are best with muscle pain. Unfortunately, my issue is both knees are bone on bone. Sinvist and steroids do not eliminate the pain, but they do take the edge off it. Visits to a pain management clinic proved to make things worse instead of better. Legal prescription opioids or narcotics send me to the emergency room. Even replacement surgery is a no go at this point because I can’t take the medication. My body can’t handle them. The most I can take is baby aspirin for routine issues. I take IBgard forIBS, which has peppermint oil.

    I will gladly listen if anyone has a better idea.

    1. HI Chris, I hear you on the bone on bone. I had both knees replaced about 12 years ago, I think. They asked me if I was an athlete, nope never was. LOL! I hear the knee replacement is not like what I had. I was blessed I interviewed 5 orthopedic doctors before I chose the best one. It took 3 months to get into him. That’s because he was the best one in Southern Utah. I had my knees scoped which was a total rip off before I was told I really needed new knees. I have a friend that just had hers replaced and her replacements are so much better now with new technology. The shots did nothing for me with the bone on bone pain. I know they gave me some kind of medication after the surgeries (I did them 2 weeks apart) but they were not opioids. One week after it was Advil/Motrin. Now they have ice machines, I would have loved that. I’m sorry you are suffering with bone on bone, that pain is the worst. Hugs, Linda

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