Water: Do You Have Enough Stored?

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After a natural disaster has occurred there’s the real possibility that your regular source for drinking water won’t be available, and if it is, it’s more than likely to have been contaminated. For an emergency such as this, it’s important that you have enough water stored away for you and your family. FEMA suggests that you store enough water to last each family member for 3 days, but what happens if your drinking water is unavailable for a much longer period? Here’s more on having enough water stored for emergencies, along with the proper way of doing it. Water, do you have enough stored?

Water: Do You Have Enough Stored?

It’s important to stop and think about whether or not you have enough water stored for your circumstances. Read this article and then make an informed decision whether you have enough water stored or not.

3 Day Period – A Good Starting Point

The CDC and FEMA both recommend that you store a minimum of 1 gallon of water per day for each one of your family members for at least a 3 day period. If there are 4 people in your family, you’ll need a minimum of 12 gallons. This should be enough water to get your family through a natural disaster, such as an earthquake, flood, or a tornado. Half a gallon will be used for drinking purposes, while the other half will be used for hygiene.

Now, let me tell you about my thoughts. I believe you need 4 gallons per person per day. I get thirsty just thinking about not being able to fill my refillable water bottle. It’s totally up to you, but 4 gallons is the REAL deal, my friends. In other words, a family of four would need a minimum of 48 gallons for three days.

In all honesty, three days worth of water storage doesn’t cut it for me. I highly recommend 7-14 days worth of water at the very least, and 30 days if you can make it work.

There may be other factors that come into play that would require you to store more water than what the experts recommend. For instance, if you have a nursing mother in your family, or you live in a hotter region, those are just a couple of the many circumstances that you’ll need to consider

Long-Term Storing

If you’re preparing for an apocalyptic disaster or any number of doomsday scenarios, you’re going to need a lot of water at your disposal. Storing long-term drinking water will prove to be more difficult, whether it’s due to limited storage space in your home, and to be quite honest, it can also get expensive. The best thing that you can do is to get your 2 week supply and to slowly build your supply from there.  

Storage Options 

Bottled Water

You can go the bottled water route by buying packages of them to last you and your family for a 3 day or 2 week period. You’ll pay more this way, but if you need to bug out, bottled water is easy to take with you. A 35 count package could be equivalent to 4.6 gallons of water, depending on the size of the bottle. That would last a single person just over 4 days. In order to cover your water needs for a week, you’ll just need 4 packages for one person, and 16 of them for a family of 4.   

5-7 Gallon Water Jugs

Everytime you go camping you probably use this type of water jug to cover all your needs. This type of water jug is sturdy and also stackable, perfect for storing. You can usually find them in a dark blue color to keep direct light out and to prevent algae from growing. They, like packaged water bottles, are easy to take with you if you’re having to leave your home in a hurry. 

WaterBOB

Many preppers plan on filling up their bathtubs with water following a disaster to ensure that they have plenty of drinking water. Your typical bathtub will get you about 100 gallons of water, but how sanitary is that? A waterBOB is also another storage option that’s neat for you to consider. Instead of filling up your bathtub directly with water, place a waterBOB in your tub that will fit nicely and will keep the contaminants out. The only downside to this option is that there may not be any water available to file the waterBOB immediately after a disaster takes place.  

55-Gallon Water Barrels  

If you have room for a 55-gallon water barrel in your home it’s one of the best storage options for larger families. They’re extremely sturdy and can store a lot of water completely sealed tight. When you have two of them on hand, you’ll have enough drinking water to last a family of 4 for almost an entire month.

However, they aren’t easily portable, weighing approximately 440 pounds when filled with water. It won’t be easy to bug-out in a hurry with this storage option.  They’re also fairly expensive too, along with the pump and drinking water hose that you’ll have to purchase.  Please remember to store all water containers at least 2 inches off the ground so concrete or other chemicals close by won’t leach into your containers. I use 2 by 4’s of lumber under my barrels.   

Should You Rotate Your Water Supply? 

Water in itself doesn’t spoil, or ever go bad. There’s no expiration date that you’ll have to worry about if it’s properly been stored. Water only goes bad if it becomes contaminated from bacteria when the container has not been sealed off completely from contaminants. So if you’ve properly sealed off the container there’s really no need to rotate your drinking water, but if you still feel uneasy about it, it won’t hurt for you to rotate your water supply at least once a year.  I use Water Preserver so I only have to rotate mine every 5 years. I don’t want the worry or hassle that comes with frequent rotations.

Other Water Purification Solutions

Although you may have plenty of water tucked away for when hard times hit, it’s a good idea to have a few methods to filter and purify water, especially if you’re forced into a position to leave the comfort of your own home. Keep a supply of purification tablets, as well as portable water filters that you can take with you to any water source. Being able to boil water with a small portable stove that you have put away in your bug-out back could also be a lifesaver.  I highly recommend this Butane Stove.

Final Word

You can never be completely prepared for when a disaster or emergency happens, but one thing you can be sure of is to have enough drinking water that’s going to last you through the event. Have you or someone you know ever been through a natural disaster and your drinking water had been compromised? What did you do, or would have done differently prior to the disaster?  Water: do you have enough stored? Read this article and let me know! May God Bless this world, Linda.

Copyright Images: Water From Spout Deposit photos_66719227_s-2019

11 thoughts on “Water: Do You Have Enough Stored?

  • September 2, 2020 at 8:19 am
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    No, we don’t have enough water stored. UWe have a 5 gallon water bottle and a partial one. I’m planning on getting a couple of more soon. And refill the one that is almost empty.

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    • September 2, 2020 at 8:21 am
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      I forgot to say that we have the water cooler thing that can cool or heat water.

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      • September 2, 2020 at 8:30 am
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        Hi Deborah, I used to have one of those then I switched to Reverse Osmosis. I live in the desert and we go through so much water I can’t lift those 5-gallon bottles anymore. Buy extra bottles when you can! Linda

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    • September 2, 2020 at 8:28 am
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      HI Deborah, that’s why I write about storing water several times a year. It reminds all of us to store more, lots more. We are so blessed to be able to just turn on the water faucet. But, we must be prepared because there will be a day we won’t have that luxury. Stay safe, Linda

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      • September 2, 2020 at 9:18 am
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        And that is why I want to get more 5 gallon jugs of water. They also come in 3 gallon. We do have a multi filter on our sink, but if we lose water, it won’t work. We have a picture that filters water, too, and extra filter, but it doesn’t filter everything out. I do know how to make a filter, and then boil water for 5 minutes. I have a couple of life straws for filtering water. I just put in some water purification in my Amazon list for Hubby to buy me. LOL He’s a Prime member.

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:51 am
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    A gallon per day… “Half a gallon will be used for drinking purposes, while the other half will be used for hygiene.” What about food prep?

    Does anyone worry about the food you may have needing water to prepare (hydrate)?
    (Examples – hamburger helper and mac & cheese take several cups each and that’s only 1 meal)
    I always wondered why it is never mentioned in the emergency preparedness guides from the government. Do they honestly think everyone is smart enough or forward thinking enough to consider this?

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    • September 2, 2020 at 10:34 am
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      Hi Bruce, this is why I always point out what they state and THEN what I believe which is 4 gallons per person per day. I can’t just leave their 1 gallon a day per person per day. It’s not realistic, I always wonder why they don’t think it through. I have had people criticize me for putting we need 4 gallons per day per person. I’m right and I will not back down. We will need more water than they are stating. I just shake my head when I read it. Linda

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  • September 2, 2020 at 10:47 am
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    You might mention the fact that in the deep south water becomes stagnant quickly. Some cities do not do a great job of chemically treating their water supply. Also there is a problem in spring and summer of bacteria known as red tide, which also effects slow moving fresh water. Be sure to visually, smell, and taste test water that has been stored a long time. It only takes a couple of days for our water supply to turn yellow, then in a little over a week it turns green. I am the only one of my family that has drank or cooked with city water since 1980. You don’t want to hear about that experience.

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    • September 2, 2020 at 11:09 am
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      Hi John, wow, I love hearing about the water in the deep south. I live in Utah, and I quit drinking or cooking with our water supply when I noticed the water was yellow. I took a white cup filled with the water to the city to ask why it was yellow. They said it was fine without even suggesting to have it tested. Well, I signed up for bottles of water to be delivered and eventually switched to Reverse Osmosis water. Then on the news one night the anchor was interviewing someone about all the cases of cancer in Farmington, Utah. This was in 1980 or so. So, My friend and I started a map with homes and names in the neighborhood. We began to put an X on every home that we knew of that had cancer. We were shocked, every third house had a child, or adult with cancer. Some had died and some had survived. All types of cancer. Was it the water? We will never know the truth. Water must be safe to drink. Linda

      Reply
  • September 2, 2020 at 12:18 pm
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    It is very sad to say that there is no way to remove chemical: fertilizers, weed killers, insect poisons, sewer contaminants, and on and on. Years ago we were taught that rain water and snow melt was reasonably clean, now we are told differently. It is hard to believe that there is a floating area in the middle of the pacific ocean that is thousands of acres in size that that is nothing but sewage and garbage. Also, most folks are not aware that the nuclear polution leaking from the nuclear plant that was destroyed in japan is still leaking, and japan has no intentions of fixing it.

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    • September 2, 2020 at 2:21 pm
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      Hi John, wow, the nuclear plant in Japan leaking, yikes! The ocean is the reason I will no longer eat fish. It’s just me, I don’t know what they have eaten in the toxic waters they swim in. Our ancestors would be rolling over in the grave right now. Linda

      Reply

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