Unemployment Checks Ending: Things to Consider

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It came a little sooner than expected and far more abruptly than what millions of Americans had hoped for. It directly affects 20 Million Americans, to put it more precisely. The CARES Act officially came to an end on July 25, 2020, and there are no other plans that have been approved to extend it at this point. Unemployment checks ending: things to consider.

The package was originally put in place to help aid Americans who had experienced unemployment due to the pandemic. An additional $600 a week was being issued by the federal government on top of what each state was already providing unemployed workers. In case you missed this post, Canned Foods I Highly Recommend You Store

Unemployment Checks Ending: Things to Consider

Even though the package is now officially expired, the Department of Labor’s jobless claims have continued to rise to over 1.1 million in unemployment, ending the week of August 15th. 

Once again, this is adding more stress and financial hardships on families and homes, especially those that are just barely staying afloat. If nothing is done, and soon, many families may become evicted and be forced into homelessness. If this troubling information directly affects you and your family, here are a few things that you may consider.

Some Assistance is Still Being Given

Though the extra $600 is no longer being issued, the unemployed assistance issued by each state will still continue. For unemployed workers, each state is still issuing a portion of their previous earnings to them, but it varies from state to state based on how much that is and how long it’s being extended. 

For example, Mississippi is only issuing $235 a week, where the state of Massachusetts is offering as much as $1,234 in assistance a week. Unemployment benefits are only lasting in the state of Georgia for up to six weeks, while in the state of Montana benefits will continue for up to 28 weeks. For the most part, however, each state has a benefits cutoff after 26 weeks. 

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But there are a few new particulars of coverage that will not end, which includes a 13-week extension of regular benefits that the federal government agreed to help each state pay.  

What About a 2nd Stimulus Check?

A second stimulus check has been rumored to be in the works for quite some time now, but no official date or amount has yet to be approved. This is due to the unfortunate and ongoing power struggle within our political parties that continues to take place in Washington, and at a time when many Americans are growing frustrated and most desperately needing a resolution. 

With the clues that the original stimulus check has left us, it’s very likely that the second wave of stimulus checks will only be a fraction of what the previous one brought us, and only be issued to families meeting certain criteria. That may be fine for many families living comfortably and unaffected in the United States, but for some, it simply won’t be enough. 

Tough Choices Ahead

Even with the assistance that continues to be provided for unemployed workers from each state, many families will struggle to pay their mortgages, let alone, other expenses they may have. Families are no longer protected from the possibility of becoming evicted and are once again having to decide which bills are going to get paid during any given month. 

  • Though the economy has started moving forward once again in many sectors, there are still several small and even large businesses that have remained closed at this point, leaving their workers in a tough spot. If you fall into this category, as hard as it may be for you to hear, it may be time for you to move in a different direction. 
  • I’m not saying that you need to go out and jump on a new career path, but a part part-time job may be something for you to think about in the meantime. But if you have been thinking about trying a different career path, now may be a good time for you to consider training and school options that will get you started. It would be good to research industries currently looking for fresh talent and see if there are job opportunities within a reasonable distance for you to explore.
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For those of you who have younger children who are left to do online schooling at home (again because of the ongoing virus), going out and getting a part-time job just to pay a sitter doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. Here are a couple of ways that you can make money from the comfort of your own home so that you don’t have to waste it all on childcare.  

Steps to Avoid Eviction 

If you are one of the millions of Americans who are afraid of being evicted because you’ve fallen behind on your rent, the first thing that you can try to do is to go to your landlord and see if there is another payment plan that you can come up with until you are in a better financial position. 

Under these unprecedented circumstances, your landlord may be more likely to work with you, and chances are, you’re not the first renters who have approached them for help due to the pandemic.   

You can also look into other assistance if that doesn’t work. Check out the local housing coalition who may be able to help you stay in your home or provide you with emergency housing if you need it. 

There is also what is called the hardship loan, which basically allows you to defer your payments so that you’re not forced to pay immediately. They have loan amounts that range from $500 to $5,000, with reasonably low-interest rates. 

Final Word

The pandemic certainly has brought difficult challenges for all of us. For some of us, it may be important that we think outside the box and adapt where we need to in order to continue to make ends meet.  What would you add to this unemployment checks ending: things to consider post? May God Bless this world, Linda

Copyright Images: Unemployment Line Smartphones Deposit photos_195590156_s-2019

24 thoughts on “Unemployment Checks Ending: Things to Consider

  • August 29, 2020 at 8:35 am
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    I just read the average bill for cable, etc. is 106 a month–cut that crap off!!!
    I bought a $30 Roku streamer, connected it in 5 minutes, subscribed to free streaming stations for 0 a month but have ads–so what!!! I can endure that instead of suffer hunger or worse, cold this winter, because I spent 1200 for cable.
    $1200 ???? Really and you can justify that when your children are hungry???

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    • August 29, 2020 at 8:47 am
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      Hi JayJay, yeah who cares about ads, they are everywhere. It’s how we get free streaming. I totally agree with you! Linda

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    • August 30, 2020 at 1:00 pm
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      People often need wifi to do online schooling with their children. My wifi comes from my cable company at $70 per month, with no other service options in my rural area. If I had kids at home, I could not “cut that crap off.”

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      • August 30, 2020 at 3:29 pm
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        Hi Diana, I have to have the internet, so I can’t cut that crap off either. It’s all good, we all different lives to live. Stay safe, Linda

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  • August 29, 2020 at 8:54 am
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    Linda, woo hoo I’m the first commentator. I have the ‘luxury’ of seeing things from both sides of the fence (politically, financially and personally) without having negative impacts on my life…yet. Bear with me, this might get long. So, let’s start with evictions: Linda, you are so right to advise people to talk to their landlord. Granted, there are landlords who won’t work with tenants but right now, most would have.. There are tenants who have Used the moratorium on evictions to stop paying rent even while they received the extra unemployment benefits. OR, worse, still stayed employed! My son’s father owns many rental properties, and ALL are in what are deemed low-income areas. Some tenants got laid off pretty fast but called him, and he was glad to work with them. These tenants used their unemployment to catch up, then continued to pay rent, and still are in spite of fewer hours once called back to work. Oh, but there’s Always the one who is a User/Abuser. He has one who had only barely moved in before our state moratorium on eviction. She has Not paid a dime of rent since April 1. She Has gone on FB telling what she bought with her stimulus check. Our state’s moratorium is lifted but the courts are so backed up he can’t even go to court until September. She owes way over $6000 in rent. Meanwhile, he has paid the property taxes, the bills for water/sewer/garbage and natural gas for water heater and heat. She has a good paying job so there is no excuse for her to not pay rent. Many of his other renters have really been hit hard, with their kids being home. Once the fedl payment went away, he went to them, talked to them, see what could be worked out. A few are doing some extra property care/work for him in lieu of full rent payment. (Oh, this is work that improves where they live but isn’t necessary.) This man knows a lot of landlords who will do the same but all have stories of that One tenant who just abuses a ‘break’ cut to them. He said he just wants people to know that all landlords aren’t A-holes, nor are people who are struggling financially, as many evictions deserve No Sympathy.
    I happen to be an independent contractor in advertising. I appreciated the new rules where I could get unemployment benefits. Those made a difference, especially since I have health issues, don’t want to be out much. I will say, flat out, that if I’d had a mortgage, car payments, I’d be in trouble. But, I would have talked to my lenders at the start! I’ve done this before in other bad times of my life. If there is one thing I could advise people, is, talk to each other! Landlords don’t want to evict, banks don’t want to foreclose, lenders don’t want to re-possess. Lol, I said my comment would get long… Peace to all.

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    • August 29, 2020 at 9:16 am
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      Hi Wendy, oh my gosh, you nailed it today! You are telling it like it is, and I LOVE it. I wouldn’t be posting anything on FB that I was buying with that stimulus check if I hadn’t paid my rent! What in the heck were they thinking???!!! Oh my gosh, I got the giggles over this comment! It’s not funny, but what were they thinking?? Pay your rent people, that’s what the check was supposed to be for!! Wow, what has this world come to?? Great comment, so glad you shared it! Linda

      Reply
  • August 29, 2020 at 10:00 am
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    American use to be the land of opportunity, now it is the land of hand outs. No one wants to work. People has time to protest, riot, money for custom shirts for this summers complaints, but they won’t clean up their homes and neighborhood. This isn’t an issue of the color of someone’s skin, but a question of character. It doesn’t take a village to raise a child, but two parents who put in the hours and the work. Morals, values and hard work…..that is what America is supposed to be based on. I am filled with compassion for people who try and do their best, even if they fail. I have none for the destroyers who contribute nothing.

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    • August 29, 2020 at 11:21 am
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      Hi Chris, I have to agree with you on how it’s partly the land of handouts. I never realized it until I moved into my current neighborhood. I was actually shocked listening to people wanting to have more kids so they would get more food stamps. Trust me, I understand people may need them for a short time. But I have neighbors 1/2 mile from my home in my local church who have been on government assistance for 10-15 years. They mention it at church parties on how to “get more money” from the government. It’s a way of life for them. Some even talk about how they escape having to pay taxes from income under the table. Another woman states she is a single mom, oh, she’s single but lives with her boyfriend the father of her child. She “qualifies” for food stamps because she is “single”. Well, she isn’t married but lives with her boyfriend. If she was married she would not qualify for food stamps or Medicade. Yes, SOME people expect handouts. It’s so sad. Linda

      Reply
  • August 29, 2020 at 10:29 am
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    I disagree with Chris. I don’t know anyone who doesn’t want to work. Places were closed and people were struggling. In our town our factories are not open full time yet, This is not the time to bash people for where they care “coming from”.
    My hair stylist gave up her unemployment the minute her place opened. She did say that the unemployment was the most she had EVER made in her life, but she would rather work. She is a 30 yr old single mom- divorced a very abusive husband. She needs the schools to OPEN so she can get back to full time (thank God for her mom).
    We help a lot of people at our local food bank. You give the advice we have been giving out. Try to get square with your landlord before you loose the check. Work on side employment. Surprisingly–go back to school for a new profession- there are lots of full scholarships out there right now.
    Here are some side jobs that we, who have income, can hire for those who are struggling:
    Get your landscaping done. Hire a college student to “tutor” your kids if they are at home . Go ahead and get pick up groceries and TIP!
    Most of all, don’t be afraid. You can do it! Your grandparents lived through much worse and they still had your parents 🙂

    Reply
    • August 29, 2020 at 11:31 am
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      Hi Janette, I think Chris is talking about way before the pandemic. I have lived here in this home for 15 years and I am shocked at what I see. I taught my kids to work and they all do. The pandemic pulled the rug out from so many people including some of my family members. I understand the people wanting to work, they were raised the right way. Unfortunately, not everyone was raised to work hard. I don’t want to argue with anyone, it’s not my intention at all. I think emotions are running high because of the lack of work and the lack of money. It’s heartbreaking to see all the people out of work right now. We will get through this but it’s going to take a very long time. Thank you for the great tips to help the people who need a little income right now. Linda

      Reply
  • August 29, 2020 at 11:16 am
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    Where I live, all of us get social security checks and many get pension checks as well. I have not been hit with any cuts to my income. But, there are a few here who, even though they get the same amount of money each month, decided to take advantage of the “no eviction” issue. One guy even went out and bought a brand new car! Now that the eviction issue is gone, they are whining about how they are going to get evicted and/or don’t have the money to pay all of the back rent! The guy with the new car? he was whining just the other day that if he has to pay all the back rent in one lump sum, he will lose the car and have no transportation!

    Something else that bothers me is that the people on housing vouchers (where the state tax money pays most of their rent) seem to be spending money like no one’s business! They get an extra stipend from the state (from the tax money) and are living high on the hog. Whereas, those of us who do not qualify for any of that type of assistance, are still having to live on just what we have always gotten! And they brag about it – that is what bothers me the most. The bragging! I simply cannot abide braggers – those who brag about things they have that they did not earn.

    Ok – rant over!!!!

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    • August 29, 2020 at 1:51 pm
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      Hi Leanne, oh I LOVE your rant, you know by now I see the very same thing. It’s hard because we as taxpayers are paying for part of their rent and food. It’s hard because we both worked hard our entire lives! I hate their bragging as well. Over my rant! Linda

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  • August 29, 2020 at 12:19 pm
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    I’m retired now so the pandemic didn’t hit me like it did those still working. Also, I was pretty much always self-employed so if I got hurt or sick income stopped until I got better. Back then cable TV was the thing and first thing we’d do is dump it. We’d stop using credit cards (because when you’re in debt the first thing to do is stop digging your hole deeper). We’ve always been readers so instead of buying books we’d go to the library and check them out. With Covid you can check our ebooks online and either read them on a Kindle or on your computer. We also, as a family, played a lot of board games or card games. We went fishing, hunting and hiking. We always had a garden and often had chickens–even when we lived in a city and whether they were allowed or not. We had garage sales and sold anything we didn’t need to live on. When business was slow and we knew we were going to miss a house or rent payment we would always call the banker or landlord (often going to see them in person) and explain our plan for getting caught up–usually the very next month. Doing so let’s them know you aren’t a deadbeat.

    Don’t depend on Government handouts. Put yourself to work. With a ladder or two, a few paint brushes and a van or pickup you can be self-employed as a house painter. If you have construction skills you can be a framer, roofer, sider, gutter hanger, or trim carpenter. If you know computers you can start an independent IT service. It takes gumption and persistence, but the payoff is huge. Think outside the box and for yourself. Keep your head up and take control of your life. You can make your own future and it might just be better than the path you were originally on.

    Reply
    • August 29, 2020 at 1:54 pm
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      Hi Ray, you know I love your comment! It’s called being self-reliant, my friend! Linda

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  • August 29, 2020 at 1:00 pm
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    Your life and work ethic sounds like our own, Ray. Our stimulus money went for trees for our daughters’ new home and our sons’ orchard. As blue collar workers, we are proud of the college educations all 4 of our children have earned. Second and third jobs, garage sales, paying off a thirty year mortgage early, never buying anything we couldn’t afford. It doesn’t take a lot of money to live well.

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    • August 29, 2020 at 1:58 pm
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      Hi Chris, way to go! Great comment, we can do anything we put our mind too! Linda

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  • August 29, 2020 at 3:27 pm
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    My husband used to work for a gentleman who had rental property and even long before these bad times hit people didn’t pay their rent. Oh they made sure they had Beer and cigarettes but oh rent that was the last thing on their minds. I’m not saying that all people are this way and they you shouldn’t buy things you want but rent ( a place to live) should come first not to the last and not pay. Also I know people have their pride but check with some local churches and see if they have a food pantry or if
    they know of one close by. I am in charge at the one at my church and we haven’t had many people needing food. Not sure if it’s because no one needs it or they don’t know about it. Might have to put up some signs to help people out.

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    • August 29, 2020 at 6:31 pm
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      Hi June, I used to do mortgages and I will tell you never ever be late on mortgage payments!! It will drop your FICO score big time! Here’s the deal the banks see it this way if you are late on rent or your mortgage payment then you will probably always be late on other payments as well. They see it as “you need to pay for a roof over your head,” if that means nothing, we shouldn’t lend money to you for a home. Right or wrong that’s what I learned when I was a banker. If people need help occasionally please ask, yes pride is hard but living on the streets is harder. Put your boots back on and get another job if you have too. Great comment, Linda

      Reply
  • August 29, 2020 at 4:20 pm
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    This topic reminds me of my home school/daycare days. I had a few that tried to sucker me and not pay. See, I trusted them as adults to recognize the essential need of great day care for your child. So, I didn’t demand a week ahead pay plan. So, on Friday if you picked up your child (or cleverly had a relative pick up your child, because we’re too stupid to be cognizant of that trick!!!) and didn’t pay for the care of that week that your child had……your child’s cubby things were in a bag waiting for you when you showed up Monday…and that was that!!
    One lady actually was on the way to a funeral and tried to deposit her young’un on my porch and because she had been late before paying, that just didn’t work.
    My skills were too good to be wasted on free loaders.

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    • August 29, 2020 at 6:25 pm
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      Hi JayJay, oh I used to baby kids to help our monthly income when my husband was in school. Your comments brought back memories of late payments or picking up kids an hour late. Luckily I didn’t have freeloaders but having people come late, took time from my own home needs. It was so frustrating. My time is worth a lot too! You had some classic stories! The funeral story, wow! It takes all kinds of people to make the world go around. Great tips to help others! Linda

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  • August 29, 2020 at 9:10 pm
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    These are all wonderful comments! My husband is the only one who works in our family. At the end of April he was furloughed from his front desk job at a local hotel. We saved our stimulus check and most of the extra unemployment money. He is still not fully back at work. Just a few days here and there to fill in. Honestly there are still days that this is very frustrating for us. But we are thankful for everything we have. We cut off every unnecessary expense to save money. I can honestly and happily say that we have been paying our rent faithfully through this entire pandemic. We even help others when we can. We are also still trying to prep during all of this as well. So I know that if we can do it on less than $300 a week, then others can too! It is all about priorities! God has got all our backs! Thank you Linda for the wonderful blog! May you all continue to be blessed!

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    • August 30, 2020 at 7:35 am
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      Hi Audrey, oh this is such wonderful news!! I love hearing you are making it even when times are tough. We have all had to cut back in so many ways. God has truly blessed you. I LOVE LOVE LOVE your comment, God has got all our backs! You and your husband a wonderful example to all. Keep up the good work!! Linda

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  • September 4, 2020 at 11:01 am
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    I liked reading All the comments after I gave mine. I did detect some ill-will towards those who are receiving help, and it’s understandable when a person knows of someone who is an Abuser of helping hands. Conversely, between the last recession and now this pandemic, I’ve had snide comments made about ‘how lucky I am’ that I don’t have a mortgage, car payment, a bunch of debt, just because I am not panicking. Luck had nothing to do with it: I was just willing to live with ‘less’ , simply to be able to live with less financial worry in case shtf. I even have had one relative say they don’t understand why I just don’t buy a new car when I ‘complain’ on social media that my car has to be fixed. Um, most times my car repair is less than a monthly payment, lol. I used to drive New cars so I know this. I even had an ad client who mentioned that I see him while in a different older vehicle every year. I just told him that I put on a lot of miles and I was tired of being upside down on car loans, so I buy my work car with cash, also saving money on insurance. He is an ins agent! The next time I saw him, he said he and his wife talked it over, and she was doing the same thing as she too drove a lot of miles: bought an old car for $1000, gave it an oil change and 2 new tires. Had already put on 45g miles. No extra money except for more oil changes. She had had to pay extra to get out of her lease agreement but since the old car was still running good, he figured they’d save a lot. So, yeah, luck doesn’t always play into having less debt. I moved from a 5000 plus sq foot victorian home to a 3000 sq ft mfg home and never regretted it. I wanted Out of payments! Yet, some people say I’m ‘lucky’. Is my house as grand as my previous? Nope. I was willing to live with less. I guess I was Lucky since I learned lessons from my folks. Just sayin’.

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    • September 4, 2020 at 11:26 am
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      Hi Wendy, I LOVE LOVE LOVE your comment! I downsized to a smaller home and haven’t looked back either. I had a car payment for years but I was working. When we retired we went down to one car. I have had people say to me “I don’t know how you get by with one car”. Well, it’s now been 12 years and it still works for us. I did have to call a neighbor once to drive me to the doctor for a minor emergency. My husband was out of town and had the car. Once in 12 years. I’m glad I know I can call a special neighbor and he can call me if we need help. It’s all good. As far as luck, it takes work and a plan to be frugal and get out of debt and have NO debt. There is nothing to be ashamed of that. I think people may think we can’t afford another car, that’s not the case at all. We don’t want another car. We live a very simple life and we are happy with that. Keep up the good work! Linda

      Reply

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