10 Important Pioneer Skills That We Need

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Whether you want to save money on your shopping trip, or you want to know how to take care of yourself, there are 10 pioneer skills that are still important today. I know there’s a lot of things that I just have no desire to learn, but there are survival skills that you need to know if SHTF. Additionally, we may be seeing another shutdown and many of us are already struggling financially. 


Related: 30 Pioneer Skills We Cannot Lose or 13 Surprising Uses for Flour

10 Important Pioneer Skills

10 Important Pioneer Skills That We Need

Some things you may just not be able to do. For instance, you just may not have the skills to turn wool into cloth or churn milk into butter. It’s ok if you don’t know every little thing, but I would suggest knowing these 10 basic pioneer skills:

#1 Bartering Survival Skills

Bartering is still a skill that is super important. I listed this as #1 because as I said above, you don’t have to know how to do everything, but if you know how to barter, you can trade one skill for another. People used to do this a lot. You can barter with food, water, other critically needed items, or your own skills. For example, if you know how to make bread, you could barter making someone bread every week as long as they help you drill a well. In the midst of a pandemic, bartering skills are great to have. To learn more about bartering, please read these posts:

#2 Raising Animals to Eat

Even a small homestead can have a few animals where you can get milk, eggs, and meat. Depending on where you live and the amount of space you have, you could raise chickens, rabbits, cows, sheep, or goats. Start small and work your way up. Some of us in HOA or PUD housing areas have limits to what we can do, darn it!

#3 Hunting and Fishing

If you live in the city and can’t have animals, you really should be learning how to hunt and fish. You can go hunting and fishing without living in the country. Get a hunting and fishing license and take the kids out throughout the summer or when the seasons allow it. You can hunt things like elk, deer, moose, or game birds. 

Read More of My Articles  10 Pioneer Skills Every 12 Year Old Should Know

#4 Starting a Fire and Cooking Over a Fire

You can barter for clothes, water, food, or other things, but you probably won’t be able to barter with someone to come start a fire and cook every time you need to eat. So, it is crucial that this is one of the pioneer skills that you learn, and learn to do well. 

When starting a fire, you want the firewood to be as dry as possible. You will want fire starters such as wood shavings, cardboard pieces, and dryer lint. 

To cook over the fire, you will want to arrange your kindling into a teepee form. Then, arrange your larger firewood into a teepee form as well so you can keep the fire going. You’ll need to have a frame to hang the pot or a grill stand for that frying pan. 

Related: Outdoor Cooking for Survival

#5 Gardening

Knowing how to grow your own food is an essential pioneer skill. Whether you are growing fruits and vegetables in a big outback garden or on your patio, the more you can do for yourself, the better. Start with something simple like a tomato plant and just keep working on it. 

Related: How to Garden in Raised Gardening Beds

#6 Food Preservation Pioneer Skills

Once you know how to raise animals, hunt, fish, and garden, you need to know how to store and save what you have. Remember, there may be a time when you can’t just walk into the grocery store to get the food that you need. The main types of food preservation include:

#7 Butchering

I remember the first time we slaughtered a chicken for dinner. I couldn’t eat dinner that night, seriously. But, I guess if I was starving I probably would have been able to eat almost anything edible. Being familiar with how to butcher the various meat options is crucial to survival. However, you could barter with this skill if you really don’t want to eat the meat yourself. 

Read More of My Articles  101 Homesteading Skills We Need To Teach

#8 Sewing and Weaving

If the stores aren’t open, you can’t go buy a new sweater, underwear, or even a pair of pants. So, in order to replace your family’s clothing, or even sew on a new button, you will need to first know how to sew. There are tons of easy patterns you can find, and you can self teach. If you don’t know how to sew a button, it’s time to start doing that and grow your knowledge from there. If you are a beginner, I recommend reading my post: Basic Sewing Machine Supplies for Beginners

#9 Map and Compass Pioneer Skills

We have it so easy being able to just type or voice command our destinations into our phones. The fact that some of us have no idea how to read a map or use a compass is terrifying. If you or your children don’t know how to use a map or a compass, it’s time to start mastering that skill. Make it a fun adventure for the kids and learn as you go, close to home.

#10 Foraging

I wrote a whole series on edible weeds! Knowing your surroundings and what you can eat if you haven’t been able to catch a fish or shoot a deer is crucial in emergency situations. Berries, nuts, mushrooms, and edible weeds can become an important food source and be a part of your regular meals. Learn what you can eat that grows in the wild as well as what is poison and dangerous. You may have a ready-made meal just outside your backdoor.

10 Important Pioneer Skills

Final Word

Knowing basic ways to survive if SHTF requires knowing skills that many of us just don’t use any more. If there is anything on this list that you don’t know how to do, I would encourage you to start gathering information and learning and practicing, now! You never know when something could happen and you may have to go back to the basics. In addition to this list, I would read: 30 Pioneer Skills We Cannot Lose.  May God Bless this world, Linda

Copyright Images: Pioneer Skills Cooking Over A Fire Deposit photos_95802776_s-2019

60 thoughts on “10 Important Pioneer Skills That We Need

  • November 29, 2020 at 7:19 am
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    I can do most of these. And what I can’t do my husband can. LOL We just bought our daughter a dehydrator for Christmas. Hers died. We also gave her an Instant Pot when I got my new Duo. She’s also a prepper. I’m wanting to make jerky for Christmas as gifts as well as some banana bread. I need to get started soon though. Time is fast running out. I need to get some more over ripe bananas. I do have some in the freezer in vacuum bags. I do love making Christmas gifts. So far, I’ve made a couch arm sewing mat. Some melt and pour soap, sugar scrub and lotion. I’ve decorated some wooden trays I bought, using my Cricut. And I’ve bought some gifts already and some are on the way. Mail ordered. LOL I’m trying to stay out of stores, and stay at home.

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    • November 29, 2020 at 7:34 am
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      Hi Deborah, wow, you have been busy! I love homemade Christmas gifts! I love making melt and pour soap. It’s addicting. I’m staying out of stores as well. Linda

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      • November 29, 2020 at 8:58 am
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        I use the Goat Milk one. Next time I want to try the Shea butter one. I scented the ones I made with Jasmine fragrance oil. Love it. I bought some in Hawaii and it was wonderful. I also got some perfume in the same scent. I love it!

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        • November 29, 2020 at 9:28 am
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          I love making soap too, but learned how to make from scratch. When I learned how to make soap, I didn’t know about melt and pour (or else there wasn’t that back then). I had so many skin problems, that I read every book I could on the subject and made my own.

          The first time I did it, I was dressed like a Covid Nurse, and was actually shaking. I got more confident as time went on. Soaping 101 on youtube is a great site to learn from, if you are interested.

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          • November 29, 2020 at 9:51 am
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            I’ve made the lye soap as well. And the first time, I was like you. LOL it took me a while to get up the courage to make it. The lye was scary at first. Now, not so much, but I always respect it and remember it can burn. I really need to make some soon. I love it. It makes my skin feel so good!

          • November 29, 2020 at 11:35 am
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            Hi Janet, I love your comment. I would be dressed like a COVID nurse too! Linda

        • November 29, 2020 at 11:34 am
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          Hi Deborah, I use the goat milk one too! I bought shea butter for something. I need to remember what I bought that for!! LOL! Linda

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    • November 29, 2020 at 10:26 am
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      Wow! You are doing fantastic! I commend you! I need to do more myself but it seems all I want to do is quilt and sew! Good Job!

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      • November 29, 2020 at 11:00 am
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        Robbie, I love doing what I do. So many people don’t sew anymore. They don’t know how. I’ve made a few small quilts. Baby quilts, too. I just make simple, scrap quilts. Nothing fancy. I’ve made masks for family, friends, and neighbors. As well as myself and my husband. He’s hardest to make for. He has a full beard, short, but full.
        I guess you’d say in,I’ve crafts of all kinds. Crochet, knit, embroidery, sewing, with my Cricut and so much more. Needless to say, I’m never bored.

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        • November 29, 2020 at 11:33 am
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          I agree with you about the sewing. I can’t imagine not knowing how to sew! Even tho I’ve sewn my whole life, none of my children got in to it. They’re in their 40’s and still bringing clothes over for me to repair! I have a goliath embroidery machine (that also sews but I never use it), 3 sewing machines, a one-needle embroidery machine (which I also never use!), a serger and a long-arm machine. Since the quarantine began in March, I’ve made 11 quilts. Needless to say, all the grandkids and great-grandkids (and then some) are getting quilts this year! I’m now making pillowcases for donation to the local hospitals. I have a ball making those! I crochet and had found a source that had an antique hemstitcher so I had alot of baby flannel blankets and burp cloths done so I could crochet the fancy edges. Those all get donated through the LDS church to local mothers’ homes. It’s hard for me to sit idle in on the couch while watching movies or even long car drives. I’ve also made a ton of masks but other than holidays ones (how long can this go on?!?), I’ve pretty much got ’em to match my outfits! :o) That’s funny about your husband’s beard-mine too! He looks like Santa but he trims it short…snow white and full! I don’t have a Cricut but I do make digital scrapbooking. My husband purchased an Accuquilt cutting machine for me for cutting out my quilting pieces and omgosh! it is THE best thing ever! I have to admit that the quarantining hasn’t affected me too much. I haven’t been bored at all. I’m especially grateful to Linda for her No Fail Bread recipe-I’ve finally perfected my bread making…much to my husband’s delight. She’s been a real blessing to us with all of her useful articles, etc.
          Sew happy!

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          • November 29, 2020 at 12:43 pm
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            Robbie, this is so funny. My husbands beard is Snow White and he also looks like Santa. Around Christmas and after the kids all look at him with awe. He goes along with them. He’s not quite as fluffy as he used to be. He’s lost quite a bit of weight due to his pancreatitis.

            I have a Brother Embroidery machine (4 X 4). It sews, and quilts, too. I do use it most of all. I also have a treadle machine. I got it for a bargain. $40 at a garage sale. It needed cleaning, oiling, a d a new belt. Now, it sews perfectly. Now if the grid goes down, I can still sew! My girls are in their late 40s, and early 50s. My son is in his early 50s as well. Hubby has two sons. Both in their late 40s. My girls don’t really sew either. One daughter is a prepper, the other is a minimalist. My son is neither. It has been nice getting to know you. God bless you and keep you well.

          • November 29, 2020 at 3:37 pm
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            Hi Deborah, how fun about your husband and “Santa”. I have a Bernina embroidery machine, oh my gosh, I love it! We have so much in common! Linda

  • November 29, 2020 at 8:48 am
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    Hi Linda! I would add first aid to your list. Mosre deaths on the Oregon trail were from secondary infections due to burns than any other causes. Cooking over wood in hard times could bring that right back. Stay safe and well!

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    • November 29, 2020 at 11:33 am
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      Hi Jan, oh, great idea! I start writing whatever comes into my head. I have a few pioneer skill posts. I’m hoping people will teach their kids and grandkids some of the skills! LINDA

      Reply
  • November 29, 2020 at 10:12 am
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    I agree with Jan on the First Aid. This will be very important in an emergency situation.

    I suppose the thing I am least experienced with is bartering. I do barter some but it is not fine tuned! Skills that would take me a bit to get back up to speed on are hunting and butchering. I have done both but it has been many many years. I think the last time for butchering was 34-35 years ago when my husband brought home a deer. It has been more than that for hunting for me! As for hunting, it is necessary to also have the equipment to do so AND the practice to be accurate and not just wound animals. Along with hunting and butchering, know how to utilize all parts of the animal you are getting – know how to preserve and process the meat, yes but what about the hide? If you know how to tan hides, those can be used for so many things. And there are other parts of an animal that have a lot of uses if you just know how. So for hunters, get to know how to use all of the animal, not just the meat.

    Sewing is a skill that many of us have but for those who do not know how to sew or have the equipment to sew, start out with something simple – I learned by making an apron first, then graduated to skirts and on to more challenging things. In a SHTF scenario, I have this covered! I have a treadle sewing machine that works like a charm so if there is no electricity, I can still sew! That is what I will barter, most likely!

    I also think that we need to assess our daily lives – sometimes I use the “what if…” statement when I am making things (food, clothing, etc.) and think about how I can do it without modern conveniences.

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    • November 29, 2020 at 11:37 am
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      Hi Leanne, I learned to sew by making an apron as well. I can sew or quilt anything. You can do so many things you will have no trouble bartering, my friend. Great commetn, Linda

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    • November 29, 2020 at 12:49 pm
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      Leanne, my first thing to sew was an apron in high school home ec. Second thing was a sleeveless dress with a zipper. I still hate putting in zippers. I almost wore the fabric out putting it in and taking it out. I did finally get it though. I wore the dress one time. I hated it! Because of that darn zipper.

      I also have a treadle machine. Love it! I love making homemade bread as well. Hubby will eat half a loaf in one sitting, he loves it so much. I should make it more often, but it doesn’t last as long as store bought and we don’t eat bread every day.

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      • November 29, 2020 at 2:50 pm
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        Ah – Home Ec classes!! I grew up with a mother and 2 older sisters who could and sisters still do sew beautifully. Mom could look at a magazine or catalog and recreate the patterns herself. I don’t recall her ever using a store bought pattern until at least I came around to sewing!! Freshman Home Ec was an apron in the fall (already had that one down pat from home), sleeveless dress w/zipper in the spring. I also hated and still do hate putting in zippers! Sophmore Home Ec was a waisted dress with the dreaded zipper but I also don’t like gathering! That dress was a bust for sure. Then in the later fall, it was a lined 2 piece skirt and blazer. I wore that skirt and blazer for many events – loved it. Needless to say, while I know how and can sew clothing, I much prefer quilts and other sewing crafts. I don’t make many articles of clothing anymore – I am too hard to fit.

        I gave up making my own bread when my daughter grew up and left home. I am alone and I know I would eat the entire loaf straight out of the oven with lots of butter! A lot of things I grew up learning to make/cook don’t get done much anymore. But, the key thing is that I do know how!

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        • November 29, 2020 at 3:02 pm
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          I took Home Ec for two years. First year, no credit, but it prepared me for the next year. Same with typing. We learned to cook on semester and sew the next. Same with the second year. The don’t have Home Ec anymore. I do think every child should take some type of sewing. At least sewing on a button and hemming a hem. Plus sewing up a rip. Even it it’s by hand. Same for basic auto maintenance. But that’s just me. The kids these days don’t know how to do much of anything. Just play on their handheld devices. It’s sad. I tried to teach my kids, but it didn’t all take. When I married my husband, I had my own tool box. Including a skill saw. I also had the tools to change spark plugs in my car. I already knew how to change a tire and how to change the oil. Not bad for a single Mom of 3.

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          • November 29, 2020 at 3:45 pm
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            Hi Deborah, a single mom with 3 kids and a tool kit! You are amazing! I sure wish they brought Home Ec and Auto Maintenance back as well. It really has short-changed kids nowadays. We were blessed! Linda

          • November 29, 2020 at 10:08 pm
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            My Dad wouldn’t even let us kids drive – with or without him until we knew how to change tires, change oil, and check spark plugs, air cleaner, etc. – basically we had to know how to maintain a vehicle as part of the responsibility of driving.

            What we did in Home Ec was sew 2 days a week, cook 2 days a week, and 1 day a week we learned other homemaking things.

            When I got married, I also had my own tools, both hand and power. My husband was a carpenter by trade and was amazed that I knew how to use a chainsaw, other power tools and actually make things with wood! Not long after we married, I wanted a couple of new wooden spoons so I went to the hardware store (also sold lumber) and picked up 4 pieces of maple scraps they had – got them free of charge. I proceeded to go home, draw out the 2 wooden spoons on the wood and started carving them out using both power tools and hand carving tools. I even have a couple of deep scars from wood carving! The other two pieces of maple I used for candle holders, drilling holes and lining them with copper “cups” from the hardware store.

            I agree that everyone should know how to maintain their clothing. My daughter graduated high school in 2004 and she took a self directed class and chose to learn to make a quilt that she then gave to me. She knows how to sew and has a machine but she says she doesn’t really like to sew. So, even though she CAN repair things, my grandkids always save their repairables for grandma! Makes me feel so special!

          • November 30, 2020 at 6:41 am
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            Hi Leanne, oh my gosh, you are such an amazing woman! Your dad was so smart to have you and your siblings do this before they got their license. I LOVE it! WOW WOW WOW!!! Linda

        • November 29, 2020 at 3:43 pm
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          Hi Leanne, oh my gosh we were so lucky to learn the experienced sewing at school! About ten years ago I discovered a “ruffler”, oh my gosh, it changed my life. I could make twirly skirts for my granddaughters or ruffles on quilts. It was a game changer. Life is so fun if you know how to sew! Linda

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      • November 29, 2020 at 3:39 pm
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        Hi Deborah, oh the zipper! If you have a good zipper foot, I could have taught you. I bet by now you know how to put a zipper in!! This is so fun to talk to each other! I love it! Linda

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  • November 29, 2020 at 3:53 pm
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    Linda, A single mom has do do what she has to do. Making minimum wage doesn’t go too far with a house payment, utilities, and food for 3 growing kids. Especially a growing boy. LOL at one time we had TV and two lawn chairs in the living room. The TV was on the floor. LOL and we used an cooler for the fridge. Ours died. No money for another one. Oh well, we survived.

    I did have a zipper food. Just didn’t sew too well. I did get it in. And I do know how. Just not my favorite thing to do. LOL I’ve made myself a make up bag with zipper. And loads of other things. It had to be perfect for my Home Ec teacher. LOL I think I was in too much of a hurry or something. I have learned to slow down.

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    • November 29, 2020 at 6:56 pm
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      Hi Deborah, isn’t it wonderful that you survived even in the somewhat worst of times? The cooler for a fridge, you rock! Linda

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      • November 30, 2020 at 7:28 am
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        We do what we have to do to survive. I got married at 16. Really to get away from home, but later it became worse. I’ve had a lot of bad things happen in my life, but I survived. I’ve had a lot of good things in my life as well. I got three children out of my first marriage. And that was good. I got to raise my children, and not their biological father. He was not a good man. Still isn’t. But I’ve now been married to a wonderful man who loves me. And I love him. And I trust him. That in itself makes me so happy I could cry. And I have. I don’t feel that I deserve to be happy, but for whatever reason God sees that I do. Life is good. And God is good!!

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        • November 30, 2020 at 8:39 am
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          Hi Deborah, oh, we all deserve to be happy! I love hearing your story. Oh, what we learn from life! Good or bad, it’s what we make of it. Love this! Linda

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  • November 30, 2020 at 7:38 am
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    Leanne, my step-dad taught me what I knew about car maintenance. Most of the rest, I learned by watching. I just used a chainsaw for the first time this month. It was an electric one, but I used it. My husband told me how to use it and watched me for the first few limbs. LOL The first year we were married I asked for a weed eater for Mother’s Day. I asked for a lawn mower, too. Hubby worked for the railroad and was gone a lot. He bought me a sled-propelled, auto start mower. All I asked for was a plain mower. LOL I do love to mow. We live on an acre of land, and the front yard is very small. Hubby owns that, and I mow the back with a riding mower. I can drive a tractor. The first time I did I was 9-10. I just drove it in circles so my grandpa and uncle could sprig the grass in a field. I thought I was so smart. LOL Little did I know. It was fun though.

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    • November 30, 2020 at 8:31 am
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      Hi Deborah, oh my gosh, I LOVE your comment!! Life is so good! Linda

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    • November 30, 2020 at 8:39 am
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      Deborah ~
      I was also about 9 when I first drove tractor. But I didn’t get to drive in circles!! I had to drive the tractor and trailer in the hay fields so my dad and brother’s could load the bales of hay. Once the trailer was loaded, dad took over. I think most of my upper body strength comes from haying. When my little sister was 9, she took over driving the tractor and I helped load the first couple of layers of bales. Had to get strong really fast!

      You were so fortunate to have found a loving man after your first marriage. My marriage didn’t end well either as my husband was an alcoholic and wasn’t concerned about food on the table as much as he worried about booze in his glass. We only had one daughter who fortunately turned out to be an amazing woman. She now has 4 kids of her own and she is such a good mother – some of that comes from me but I was always so stressed after her dad and I divorced that I know there were times that I was not a good mother to her. Now I try to be the best grandmother I can possibly be. The kids call me their science gramma because I am always coming up with science experiments for them to do.

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      • November 30, 2020 at 8:45 am
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        Hi Leanne, oh the science gramma! I love this! I think being a mother is one of the hardest jobs on the planet. It’s rewarding for sure, but it’s hard. You rose above a bad marriage and a wonderful daughter came out of it. Oh, and the 4 grandkids are susch a blessing. Linda

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      • November 30, 2020 at 2:16 pm
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        Leanne, my ex was also a drinker, and a womanizer. Among other things we won’t go into. He was also more interested in his beer than anything else at home. We were married a little over 10 years, and 3 children. I married again less than a year later. That one lasted 6 years total. Half that time we were separated. He was a worse drinker than the first one. After he got his first DUI, he would get drunk every night and threaten to shoot himself. I was about ready to help him, so I gathered all his guns up and took them to his mother’s house. When he told me to go get them, I told him if he wanted them to go get them and explain to his mother why he wanted them. Not too long after that, I left for good. I moved out of town to get away from him.

        Oh, my daughter and step-son/son in law got my husband and me together.

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        • November 30, 2020 at 3:15 pm
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          Hi Deborah, wow, talk about a wonderful love story. God works in mysterious ways. You are a strong and loved woman now. Thank goodness for your daughter step-son/son bringing you together. I love this! Linda

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          • November 30, 2020 at 3:42 pm
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            Linda, I love the story too. Mostly because it’s so true. My past life was hard, but now it is so much better! It’s so amazing to still be alive after a lot of what I’ve been through. It was all worth it to get to where I am today. Life just gets more awesome every year!

          • December 1, 2020 at 5:36 am
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            Hi Deborah, I had a rough childhood, I wonder if you and I may have PTSD, every time I read about it, I’m sure I have it. But the good thing I rose above it and life is wonderful. Linda

  • November 30, 2020 at 11:01 am
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    I agree that Home Ec. Sewing should be reinstituted into schools. However, I am firm believer that we should also return auto mechanics (maybe they’ll let girls do it now), plumbing, wood working and electrical. My two boys each participated in building a house that was auctioned off. The experience has served each well. We have lost sight of the fact that many children do not want to, or can’t afford to go to college. But there are also some who are extremely good with their hands and enjoy it.

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    • November 30, 2020 at 11:22 am
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      Hi Deanne, I totally agree with you. We need both Home Ec. and Auto Mechanics and woodworking. We need all skills, not just college degrees. Some of the skills you mentioned are worth more than gold to me. We need to follow our dreams to learn skills we will love to do the rest of our life. Great comment, Linda

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      • November 30, 2020 at 2:21 pm
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        Oh, I agree 100%. Embroidery, crocheting, knitting are some others that need to be taught. I learned to knit at age 54, from a book and YouTube. I learned to crochet in my mid to late 20’s from a book. No internet then. I’ve made one pair of socks. LOL Now, I’d use circular needles and not the DPNs.

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        • November 30, 2020 at 3:16 pm
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          Hi Deborah, life is good when we have hobbies or skills! Love this, Linda

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          • November 30, 2020 at 3:48 pm
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            I sometimes think I have too many hobbies. LOL OK, not really, but I do have a wide variety. And I love them all. I just got some more of my Jasmine oil and as soon as I get the Goats milk soap, I’ll be making some more soap. I used some of my first batch last night. I smelled so good when I went to bed. LOL I will be making other scents, too. My sis in law and I both love the Jasmine. My daughter can’t use lavender, it stops her nose up. I think she’s allergic to it. I’ll make her some other scent. Maybe Ylang Ylang. Not sure, yet. I’ll think of something though.

          • December 1, 2020 at 5:37 am
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            Hi Deborah, oh we can never have too many hobbies!! LOL! Now, I want to order some Jasmine oil. Squeal! Linda

    • December 12, 2020 at 4:36 pm
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      I wonder why they no longer offer auto mechanics in school? It used to really be mechanics with the older cars when i went to school in the 60’s and 70’s but now cars have got all that computer things on them maybe that is why it isn’t offered anymore.About have to be a scientist and have a room full of gadgets before you can work on one or find out what is wrong with it. I can change a tire learned when i was 15. Replace a battery and a few other things.

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      • December 12, 2020 at 5:50 pm
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        Hi Donna, here in Utah and several other states (not all) stopped teaching Home Economics, Wood Working, and Auto Mechanics many years ago. It’s really too bad because they are skills our youth need. In some cases, not all, they will not learn how to sew, work on a car, or woodworking at home. Stay safe, Linda

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  • December 1, 2020 at 6:48 am
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    Linda, PTSD is a possibility. I started out without my daddy. He got hit by a car because his car broke down. This was the last day of March 1951. I was born in October. He was 25 years old. I’ve always wondered if I was the cause. I’ve cried all my life for my daddy. Before I was born, Mother’s veins in her uterus ruptured. I was born emergency C-section. They cut my face and Mother almost bled to death. The doctor told my grandparents that there was little chance Mother would make it and none that I would. And that was the start of my journey in life. The ending, so far, has been better.

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    • December 1, 2020 at 9:21 am
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      Hi Deborah, oh I forgot about your daddy and the car accident. Man, your mom must have had a very hard life as well. Wow! I always tell my kids, you never really know what’s going on behind closed doors to speak. So many people suffer silently. Linda

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      • December 1, 2020 at 10:13 am
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        That is so true. We lived with my grandparents until I was 5 1/2. At that time, Mother remarried. He was totally different from what I was used to. I’d have rather stayed with my grandparents, but never said it.

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  • December 1, 2020 at 6:54 am
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    Linda it’s the fragrance oil. The Jasmine Absolute I just got didn’t have much of a smell. Just an FYI. I use the Thieves or similar, in my hand sanitizer. It’s not as drying and smells wonderful. It has cloves in it. I do have a recipe somewhere if interested. Just let me know. But you can buy it already mixed.

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    • December 1, 2020 at 9:22 am
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      Hi Deborah, thank you I have plenty of soap that I made. I was so afraid I would put too much oil in it that I didn’t put enough. Live and learn, but I still love it, because I made it! Linda

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      • December 1, 2020 at 10:16 am
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        I do the same. I use my soap exclusively when I have it. LOL I do run out too often! I’m trying to do better. I’m making extras this time of year. I do have a tendency to give too much away. Everybody loves the goat milk soap.

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  • December 1, 2020 at 1:30 pm
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    I’m wondering what everyone is cooking today. I’m cooking pinto beans in my InstantPot. I plan on browning some ground beef with taco seasoning and put in it. I also want to make a pan of cornbread to go with it.
    Can your believe people buy baked cornbread? I saw a lady today with a pan in her cart. I just shook my head, in my head. LOL

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    • December 1, 2020 at 2:48 pm
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      Hi Deborah, they make cornbread in a pan? Oh, I did not know that. I don’t think I have ever seen it in a pan. I love pinto beans in the Instant Pot. We’re still eating the last of the ham and bean soup from the Thanksgiving ham. Yummy! Linda

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      • December 1, 2020 at 3:21 pm
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        Yes, it was already cooked. The Deli at out local store makes it. I can’t believe people don’t make it at home. They make mixes for it. All you need is milk and egg. I usually make mine from scratch though. Not hard at all. I learned from my grandmother. And my mother.

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      • December 1, 2020 at 3:24 pm
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        Oh, and the beans were so good. I cooked them on slow cook for an hour and then 35 minutes on pressure. Cooked the beef, with the taco seasoning, added it to the beans and slow cooked for 30 minutes while the cornbread was mixed and cooked. Now, I’m stuffed. LOL I love pintos cooked any way.

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        • December 1, 2020 at 3:55 pm
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          Hi Deborah, so how many cups of beans and how many cups of water? Linda

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          • December 1, 2020 at 4:03 pm
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            True. But I do keep a couple of packages here.

  • December 2, 2020 at 12:03 pm
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    What a great list! If there were to be One other thing I’d add would be to Get to Know a Rural person if a reader lives in town. Many of us already do most things on your list. Like, I barter hunting use of my land with my neighbor for his plowing my driveway. I’d be happy to let people do a garden, could teach them food preservation, etc, for some yardwork. Maybe I will go on your FB page to suggest this. I have to relate a funny thing: a buddy of my neighbor’s came to hunt here. He got a deer in less than an hour. He had a brand-new knife set…um, but had No idea how to gut/bleed the deer. (I guess his nephew usually did this when they hunted together.) Big laugh when he found out my neighbor also didn’t know how…hey, he doesn’t hunt, just has buddies who come here. Their bright idea was that I could do it for them! “Nope, not my deer. ” Gosh, I butcher chickens, not deer (though I helped my dad but too many years ago). I took pity and called my other neighbor who came over. Again, they thought he’d do it. Same response as me but he would tell them How to do it. I then told my ‘barter neighbor’ to use his tow truck to lift that deer up to hang. The job got done, deer was brought to the processor. This story brings out again the Need to know rural people. What I don’t know, I know somebody who does. My barter neighbor has been getting to know more of our neighbors. Occasionally I still roll my eyes and mutter “cidiots” when some hunters come here.

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    • December 2, 2020 at 12:17 pm
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      Hi Wendy, I would love for you to share it on our FB group. Thank you! That story is the best, it’s your Deer! I love it! I cut up a deer my husband shot and dragged home. Key word, ONCE. Never again! LOL! Great comment, I LOVE it! You made my day! Linda

      Reply

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