Compare Food Storage-Green Beans And Corn

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Today I want to compare food storage as in green beans and corn. When we had six of us living at home, we pressure canned pints of green beans we grew in the garden and we froze fresh corn scraped off the cob before the corn became genetically modified. Years ago, we used the dark rich soil on our land with zero pesticides required. I purchased seeds before they called them Heirloom seeds. Yes, I purchased a few plants, but mostly used seeds because they were cheaper. Wow, how things have changed over the years concerning seeds. Who would have guessed that a company could patent/own certain seeds?

Who in the world would have ever thought you could be arrested for saving your own garden seeds. Wow, I still can’t wrap my head around the fact that saving some seeds is illegal. If you have seeds that are owned by a certain company, you better not save them. Please remember to get several can openers. Can Openers

Today is not about gardening, but buying cans of corn and green beans. These are all ready to eat right out of the can.

Compare Food Storage-Corn

compare food storage

I’m really glad a reader asked me yesterday, “what is a #10 can?” I remember my publisher asking me the same thing. In case you still need a copy of my book, please buy the hard copy and study it with your family. “Prepare Your Family For Survival” by Linda Loosli. Let me explain what a #10 can is, it is a can that is 7 inches high and 6-1/4 inches in diameter. It’s fairly similar to the large coffee cans you can still find at the grocery stores. I’m going to talk about the cans above going left to right. I did not add sales tax to the products listed below. Please keep in mind that prices can change daily, I have no control over the cost of each item. One can of corn has sugar!! Why does it need sugar?

Thrive Life

The first item on the left end is a #10 can of freeze-dried corn, you can eat it directly out of the can, or hydrate it and serve as a side dish. It has a shelf-life of about 25 years, unopened, depending on the temperature where you store your food storage. It’s great when you add it to soups. Freeze-dried by Thrive
Ingredients: Sweet corn, nothing else. It weighs .99 lbs. and today’s price is $19.59. Please compare ounce to ounce when buying any food storage, the cans may be the same size but may have different ingredients and weigh more or less than other cans. Don’t forget to add in the shipping cost, if applicable.

Great Value

It weighs 15.25 ounces and cost $.50 cents today. Ingredients: corn, water, and salt. Suggested expired date: 8-8-19.

Kroger

It weighs 15.25 ounces and cost $.50 cents last week. Ingredients: corn, water, SUGAR, and salt. Suggested expired date: 12-2019.

Libby’s

It weighs 15 ounces and cost $.77 cents today. Ingredients: corn, water, and salt. Suggested expired date: 12-2019.

Organic Great Value

It weighs 15.25 ounces and is USDA/Organic and cost $1.32 today. Ingredients: Organic corn, water, and sea salt. Best if used by date: 12/31/18.

DelMonte

It weighs 15.25 ounces and is Non-GMO and cost $.68 cents today. Ingredients: corn, water, and sea salt. Best if used by 9-9-19.

Compare Food Storage-Green Beans

compare food storage

Thrive Life

Is a #10 can of freeze-dried green beans, you can eat it directly out of the can or hydrate it and serve as a side dish. It has a shelf-life of about 25 years unopened, depending on the temperature where you store your food storage. It’s great when you add it to soups or stews. Freeze-dried by Thrive
Ingredients: Green beans, nothing else. It weighs .34 lbs. and today’s price is $20.19. Please compare ounce to ounce when buying any food storage, the cans may be the same size but may have different ingredients, and weigh more or less than other cans. Don’t forget to add in the shipping cost if applicable.

Butter Kernel

It weighs 14.5 ounces and cost $.76 cents today. Ingredients: cut green beans, water, and salt. Expiration date: 8-28-2019.

Double Luck

It weighs 14.5 ounces and cost $.40 cents today. Ingredients: green beans, water, and salt. Expiration date: 7-16-2019.

Libby’s

It weighs 14.5 ounces and cost $.77 cents today. Ingredients: cut green beans and salt. Best if used by date: 12-2019.

Kroger

It weighs 14.5 ounces and cost $.50 cents last week. Ingredients: green beans, water, and salt. Best by 12-2019.

DelMonte

It weighs 14.5 ounces and cost $.68 cents today. Ingredients: green beans, water, and sea salt. The can says Non-GMO. Suggested expiration date: 7-19-2020.

I hope today you learned a little about how to compare food storage. Did you notice some of the cans look like they are the same size but weigh different amounts and cost a little differently per ounce? I decided Mark and I needed to stock up on items we can share with our friends and neighbors when a disaster or unforeseen emergency comes our way.

Let me know what canned food items you want to stock up on and let’s compare food storage ideas. I bought a few cases of different cans to fill the pantry.

I hadn’t seen the brand Double Luck for years, I didn’t realize they still sold them. I hope this makes you compare food storage purchases in the future. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected.

Survival food by Linda

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9 thoughts on “Compare Food Storage-Green Beans And Corn

  • October 2, 2017 at 5:09 am
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    I buy both the freeze dried, and the regular cans. The freeze dried last a long time, so they are stored for emergency. The regular cans need to be used and rotated. The deer had a feast on our garden this year, so I didn’t can my own.

    Reply
    • October 2, 2017 at 8:55 am
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      Hi Janet, oh no the deer had a buffet of all your veggies??? I have to buy both freeze-dried for long-term (except for a few that I open like onions, celery for soups). I wanted people to realize we need both types of food storage. Great comment, rotate and rotate. Linda

      Reply
  • October 2, 2017 at 8:03 am
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    Sorry if I’m dense but if the first can is a #10 what are the other 5 cans to be considered?
    Echo, Fridley, MN

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    • October 2, 2017 at 9:12 am
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      Hi, Echo, I just wanted to show people that you can buy different kinds of green beans and corn. Some people wondered what a #10 can was, I also wanted to show them the different smaller cans available. Linda

      Reply
  • October 2, 2017 at 9:01 am
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    Would you please compare quality/taste of the freeze dried versus canned? A #10 can is quite an investment for me & I’d hate to end up with something no one will eat. I bought the #10 can of Augason’s Cheese Blend Powder from Walmart for $17 & the grandkids have pronounced it “gacky”! I have to agree.

    Reply
  • October 2, 2017 at 11:38 am
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    Linda, you’re right on in helping people decipher labels and sizes. I like S&W canned beans and frequently find them on sale as inexpensive as store brands. They have a regular style line and a lower sodium line. The regular line contains sugar, the lower sodium line has no sugar. They only thing I can figure out is that sugar may improve quality. (Remember from Master Food Preserver classes that they lower the sugar in jam, the shorter the quality lasts.) The lower sodium line has other ingredients for “firmness.” As both salt and sugar have roles in food preservation, substitutions would be made when those ingredients are absent. Lots to think about but there are a ton of good canned choices to store. Thanks for posting.

    Reply
    • October 2, 2017 at 12:40 pm
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      Debbie, this is so crazy I can’t remember the name on some of the cans, but I used my phone to look it up. LOL! It is used to keep the food firm. I was looking at so many cans, it was a bit overwhelming. But my point was to show people how cheap we can buy 30 days worth of food. We can’t always have a garden and produce all our family needs. Plus, some people have no desire to can food, I get it. We all have talents in different areas. It’s so crazy when companies make some foods low fat, they add sugar to make them palatable. Yikes! I want people to be aware of what they are buying. I wish you and I had taken the Master Preserver Canning class together. Oh, my gosh, it was so fun! Have a great day, Linda

      Reply
  • October 2, 2017 at 1:57 pm
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    Thank you, Linda.
    As a single person, I purchase Thrive products for long term storage in their pantry cans. That way, I don’t feel like I am, perhaps, going to have to dispose of food that may not get used. It also gives me a way to try something before I purchase in a #10 can.

    For those who wonder about the quality – I love eating the freeze-dried corn out of hand – so sweet and crunchy. All of their products that I have tried are excellent.

    That being said, I don’t use much of my freeze-dried foods on a regular basis. I have it for long term issues. I have other canned goods for regular daily use.

    Another great post. Keep them coming.
    ~ Leanne

    Reply
    • October 3, 2017 at 11:47 am
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      Hi Leanne, thank you do reminding me about the pantry cans! I just taught a class and showed them the size. I’m on it, I write about those. Great tip! My “food bag” that goes with my 72-hour kit has the pantry size cans. I need to get the word out about that size. Hugs! Linda

      Reply

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