Baby Powder on Blue

Baby Powder: An Unexpected Prepping Essential

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Everyone knows that having a well-stocked arsenal of supplies can help you navigate through uncertain times. While staples like food, water, and medical kits are commonly discussed, there is one item that often flies under the radar, baby powder. Yes, you heard that right! Baby powder is not just for babies anymore. There are many ways to use baby powder as an unexpected prepping essential.

Baby Powder An Unexpected Prepping Essential

1. Moisture Control

One of the key benefits of baby powder is its ability to control moisture. This can be particularly useful in a prepping scenario where moisture can lead to various problems. Whether dealing with damp clothes against your body, sweaty feet, or a humid environment, baby powder can come to the rescue. Simply sprinkle some powder on the affected area or item to absorb excess moisture and keep things dry. 20 Dry Goods for a Kitchen

2. Fire Starting Aid

When it comes to starting a fire, every prepper knows the importance of having reliable tools. Surprisingly, baby powder can serve as a fire-starting aid. It can help ignite a fire when used correctly. Using a small amount of baby powder as fuel can increase your chances of successfully starting a fire in challenging conditions. 15 Different Ways to Make Fire Starters

3. Odor Control

In a survival situation, personal hygiene may become a challenge. However, maintaining good hygiene is crucial for both physical and mental well-being. Baby powder can be used as a quick fix for combatting unpleasant odors. Whether it’s a smelly armpit, a musty tent, or even a pet’s bedding, a sprinkle of baby powder can work wonders in neutralizing odors and keeping things fresh. 72-Hour Pet Kits

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4. Insect Repellent

Bugs and insects are a common problem, especially in outdoor settings or emergencies. While there are countless insect repellents available on the market, baby powder can provide an alternative solution. Many insects dislike the texture and smell of baby powder, making it an effective way to keep pests away. Apply a thin layer of baby powder to exposed skin or sprinkle it around your camping area to keep those pesky critters at bay. Natural Ways to Get Rid of Insects in Your Home

5. First Aid Applications

When medical supplies are scarce, being able to improvise is so important. Baby powder has several uses in the first aid world. It can help soothe irritated skin, prevent chafing, and reduce friction between surfaces. Baby powder can act as a dry lubricant, making it easier to remove splinters or bandages without causing additional discomfort. It’s super gentle, which makes it a good thing for all ages, including kids. Types of Medicines You Need for a First Aid Kit Johnson and Johnson Baby Powder

6. Food Storage Preservation

Proper food storage is paramount in any prepping plan. Baby powder can also be a valuable product in this area. When you sprinkle a small amount of baby powder inside food storage containers, you can help absorb moisture and prevent spoilage. Please only do this if you keep your FOOD packages in their original packaging. Baby powder can deter pests like ants and cockroaches, keeping your food supplies safe and uncontaminated. How To Store Your Food Storage

7. Alternative Hygiene Product

In dire circumstances where traditional hygiene products may be unavailable, baby powder can be an alternative. Although it may not replace a thorough shower, baby powder can help absorb excess oils, freshen up hair, and even serve as a makeshift dry shampoo. Baby powder can provide a much-needed boost to personal hygiene when other resources are limited. 35 Essential Personal Hygiene Products You Need to Stock

Can baby powder be used for wound care in a prepping scenario?

While baby powder can help reduce friction and aid in wound healing, it should not be used as a substitute for proper wound care supplies. In a prepping scenario, it’s so important to prioritize cleanliness and sterile wound care techniques. Baby powder should only be used as a temporary option and under the guidance of a medical professional. Uses for Bandaids: Beyond Covering Cuts and Scrapes

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How long does baby powder last in prepping storage?

Baby powder has a long shelf life, typically lasting around 2-3 years when stored in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight. However, it’s always smart to check the expiration date on the packaging and replace it if it has expired or shows signs of going bad.

Is baby powder safe to use for prepping purposes?

Baby powder is generally considered safe for prepping purposes. However, it’s important to read the labels and choose one that does not contain harmful ingredients such as talc. Look for natural alternatives like cornstarch-based powders.

FACTS

I have read about the lawsuits for the 40,000 users who got ovarian cancer from the Johnson and John Baby powder. That is terrible. I read it had particles of asbestos, which most houses with popcorn ceilings had years and years ago. After 1980 the popcorn ceilings no longer contain asbestos. Because of the lawsuit Johnson & Johnson a reputable company is paying settlements to those who were affected. I have no fear of using their products. Asbestos and Talcum Powder

More Tips

Final Word

The next time you’re looking at baby powder and wondering if you can use it for prepping, you can! I hope these tips come in handy and you find a way to use them for prepping in any way you find useful. Small items like these can make a huge difference in your prepping life. If you have other helpful uses for baby powder, please let me know in the comments section so I can pass the info on. May God Bless this World, Linda

Copyright Images: Baby Powder on Blue Depositphotos_12174918_S by Gvictoria, Talcum Powder Depositphotos_202820112_S by Sewcream

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12 Comments

  1. If/when things decline to a point that we are required to more physical labor than the norm to accomplish day to day living we will sweat and rub more body parts together.
    Improper footwear will also become an issue, not only from bad choices made based on looks and design but, from weight loss that will incur as a result of non availability of fast food and junk food.
    Anti friction such as baby powder becomes crucial as well as anti chaff such and the stick I use from Gold Bond.

  2. I hesitate to use powders of any kind – probably from the issues that arose a few years ago! But, I think it would be great to keep corn starch on hand at all times and mix my own powders using essential oils if it is for odor control; plain for moisture and chaffing. That said, corn starch can be used in cooking for thickening things as well. Not sure how corn starch would work for other applications. Oh, another thing that corn starch can do is absorb oils from the scalp like a dry shampoo (scented powders can do the same). Just sprinkle some on, let it sit for a few minutes and brush it out – I’ve used this during long camping trips if water is in short supply.

  3. I agree with Leanne. I am hesitant about baby powder, corn starch is better. Johnson and Johnson baby powder has been known to cause cancer. You can also smell it when someone is using it. Personally I use gold bond but I do not know about its other uses.

    1. Hi Judy, I have read about the law suits for the 40,000 users who got ovarian cancer from the Johnson and John Baby powder. That is really terrible. I read it had particles of asbestos, which most houses with popcorn ceilings had years and years ago. After 1980 the popcorn ceilings no longer contain asbestos. Because of the lawsuit Johnson & Johnson a reputable company is paying settlements to those who were affected. I have no fear in using their products. I understand your thoughts for sure. Linda (correction not 10,000 but 40,000)

  4. Linda, can you use cornstarch instead of baby powder? I don’t think I want baby powder on my food. Just me and only an idea!

    1. Hi Deborah, thanks for catching that, I added this: Please only do this if you keep your FOOD packages in their original packaging. I try to make sure everything is free of bugs and stored in airtight containers. I would not use cornstarch it has a very short shelf life because it’s made from corn grain. Thank you, Linda

  5. I love baby powder and have used it all my life. In addition to the uses you described it can also be helpful in disguising yourself. Back in Junior High I, at 12 yrs old, was the only kid who could grow sideburns. So when we put on the play Dobie Gillis and I got the part of his dad we used baby powder to make my hair gray.

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