Soda Bread: Step By Step How To Make It

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This soda bread is awesome for the new bread maker. It does not need yeast, yeast is very scarce right now. Here again, this not a yeast bread. It’s a very simple bread recipe that just about anyone can make with ease and confidence.

You can make this bread with seven simple ingredients we all should have in our pantry and refrigerator. So, this means we can make this easy bread at the last minute to serve to family and friends.

It’s crusty on the outside and moist on the inside. I call it my easy soda bread anyone can make.

Kitchen Items Needed

How To Make Soda Bread

Step One

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Grease a 9-inch cast-iron skillet with butter. (You can also use a cookie sheet) Grab a bowl and mix together the flour, baking soda, salt, and sugar. 

Easy to make Bread

Step Two

Make a well in the center of the mixture. Add the egg, buttermilk, and the melted butter. Stir until mixed thoroughly, the dough will be sticky.

Combine the ingredients

Step Three

Sprinkle flour on the countertop and use the flour on your hands to mold the dough in a round shape. Place the dough in the cast-iron skillet. Use a knife to cut an X on the top of the dough. Sprinkle a little tiny amount of flour on the dough.

Soda Bread: Step By Step How To Make It

Step Four

Bake in the oven for 35-40 minutes, or until done. If the bread sounds hollow on the bottom when tapped, it’s done.

Soda Bread: Step By Step How To Make It

Step Five

Let the bread rest on a cooling rack until slightly cool. Slice and enjoy.

Soda Bread: Step By Step How To Make It

Step Six

Serve warm with butter and your favorite topping.

Soda Bread with butter

Soda Bread Recipe

5 from 3 votes
Freshly Baked Soda Bread
Soda Bread by Food Storage Moms
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
40 mins
Total Time
45 mins
 
Course: Bread
Cuisine: American
Servings: 6 people
Author: Linda Loosli
Ingredients
  • 4 cups white flour (I use bread flour)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 egg (slightly beaten)
  • 1-3/4 cup buttermilk
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Grease a 9-inch cast-iron skillet with butter. (You can also use a cookie sheet) Grab a bowl and mix together the flour, baking soda, salt, and sugar. Make a well in the center of the mixture. Add the egg, buttermilk, and the melted butter. Stir until mixed thoroughly, the dough will be sticky. Sprinkle flour on the countertop and use the flour on your hands to mold the dough in a round shape. Place the dough in the cast-iron skillet. Use a knife to cut an X on the top of the dough. Sprinkle a little tiny amount of flour on the dough. Bake in the oven for 35-40 minutes or until done. I check for doneness by tapping the bread when golden brown. If it sounds hollow, it's done. Let the bread rest on a cooling rack until slightly cool. Slice and enjoy.

Can I use a Cookie Sheet

Yes, you can. You can use parchment paper or grease the cookie sheet and bake at 400 degrees for 35-40 minutes, or until golden brown. If the bread sounds hollow on the bottom when tapped, it’s done.

How Do I Store Soda Bread?

The best way to store it is in plastic bags for 3-4 days.

Can I make this without buttermilk?

It tastes better made with buttermilk. If you don’t have buttermilk, just add 1 tablespoon of white vinegar or lemon juice to one cup of milk. Now you have buttermilk. The buttermilk helps quick bread rise.

What Can I Serve With It?

  • Scrambled eggs
  • Bacon and eggs
  • Quiche
  • Soup or stews
  • Casseroles
  • Spaghetti
  • Tossed salads
  • Spinach salads

What Toppings Can I Put On It?

  • Butter
  • Jam, jelly, or fruit preserves
  • Maple Syrup
  • Sliced cheese
  • Sliced cooked sausage
  • Sliced ham
  • Use like biscuits with cream gravies

Where Did Soda Bread Originate?

I quote Wikipedia: “In Europe, soda bread began to appear in the mid-19th century when bicarbonate of soda first became available for use as a raising agent. Bread, griddle cakes, and scones with bicarbonate of soda, plus cream of tartar or tartaric acid became popular in Austria, Britain, Ireland, and Poland.”

Can I Freeze It?

Yes, you can. Just place the bread in a freezer bag and store it for 2-3 months in your freezer.

Final Word

I’m really trying hard to teach the world to cook from scratch, and this soda bread is one more way to do it. If you make a pot of soup, you’re going to want to make this bread to stretch your budget.

I can hear a few people saying I don’t eat carbs, I get it. But there are so many families that need to make their grocery budget go farther. May God bless this world, Linda

How To Make Biscuits

How to Make Corn Tortillas

19 thoughts on “Soda Bread: Step By Step How To Make It

  • March 30, 2020 at 7:48 am
    Permalink

    Thank you for trying to help calm people’s fear of not being able to feed themselves. There are so many grocery store dependent people it is scary. Scary event, panic buying, hoarding, supply chain problem, highjacking delivery vehicles, food shortages. Grocery store dependent people will not last over two months. People used to laugh snuggly about “those crazy preppers, now everyone is trying to figure out how to be one within a week. Learn then teach your children how to feed themselves! Give them the peace of mind to have food security.

    Reply
    • March 30, 2020 at 8:36 am
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      H Michael, thank you for your kind words. This is a way of life for you and me, no panic, no fear, we are prepared. I wish this pandemic would wake a few people up to be prepared. My gut tells me, it will not. But I’m hoping people will learn they cannot depend on anyone else and they need to take care of themselves. It would be very hard for me to look at my loved ones and say, “I wish I had stocked more food”. Let’s pray they get it, this time! Stay well, Linda

      Reply
  • March 30, 2020 at 8:47 am
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    I am grateful for your sharing of simple budget stretching recipes. You are an encyclopedia of useful tips for the challenges of this present time! I plan to print out your recipes and your advice, for there is no guarantee we will always have access to the internet. (At my age, I cannot trust my memory to recall all that you have shared.) Stay safe, Linda, keep on posting, and God bless.

    Reply
    • March 30, 2020 at 9:21 am
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      HI Debbie, you are so nice, thank you for your kind words. I’m worried about the internet going down, too. Let’s hope everyone prints them out. Stay well and keep on baking! Linda

      Reply
  • March 30, 2020 at 9:28 am
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    Good Morning, Linda. As you know, I eat low carb, however, right now, during this time, I am somewhat staying with my lifestyle, but at the same time, it’s been blown out the window. I’ve had a lot of food given to me that does not fit in my lifestyle, but for the most part it is still somewhat good food. Even though I was/am prepared, I’m doing just fine. I also know that I’ll get back on track when this gets under control. I’m grateful for what I had been putting aside for that “rainy day”. Between what little I have bought and what has been given to me, I’ve used very little of my stockpile. I’ve gone back to baking bread, but not the low carb bread which I have yet to find a good recipe and I’ve been trying for 3 years, lol. Good ole fashion homemade bread. I had forgotten how much fun it is to bake your own bread. To all your readers and yourself, of course. Please, everyone stay home, stay safe, and for goodness sake, don’t get around other people unless you absolutely have to. If you have kids at home, please, please do not take them grocery shopping with you. You could be putting an elderly person (like me) at risk.

    Reply
    • March 30, 2020 at 11:06 am
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      Hi Pam, I’m glad to hear you are doing fine right now. Making bread relaxes me for some reason. There is something so awesome about having your hand in the bread dough, life is so good. I sure hope people are not taking their kids to the grocery stores. There are too many sick people who may not know they are sick or could give it to others. Stay well, Linda

      Reply
  • March 30, 2020 at 10:04 am
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    5 stars
    Thank you Linda for this recipe. Our local stores here in the Prescott, AZ area have not had yeast for several weeks.

    Reply
    • March 30, 2020 at 11:03 am
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      Hi Kathie, I have heard this, so I HAD to share my Soda bread recipe, glad you can use it!! Times are crazy but we need to feed our families, God bless you, Linda

      Reply
  • March 30, 2020 at 2:02 pm
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    I love all your recipes and tips, keep them coming. When you bake in a cast iron pan, do you need to heat it up first? Before you place the “dough” in or just when are ready to bake?

    Reply
    • March 30, 2020 at 2:24 pm
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      Hi Carol, this soda bread I did not preheat the cast iron pan. If I ever preheat a pan I will for sure put it in the recipe card. It’s so fun baking, let’s do it! Linda

      Reply
  • March 30, 2020 at 2:43 pm
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    Hi Linda, Thanks to you and your sensible advice I had a full pantry and freezer when the virus hit.
    But, here in Oz buttermilk isn’t a pantry staple so I was wondering whether I could add a bit of melted butter to the milk and vinegar mix. Do you think that would give a better flavour or have any idea whether it could be a problem?
    PS We’re close to a full lockdown here and both the internet and our phone lines are feeling the effect of increased traffic. Calls don’t connect and the internet either won’t load or falls over so I’ve been madly saving your items to the desktop computer or printing them off. I have a feeling I’m going to become very grateful for your articles in the months to come.

    Reply
    • March 30, 2020 at 3:43 pm
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      HI Carol, I have heard the internet is really flaky because of everyone on the block using the internet for homeschooling or whatever. Everyone is home, or those that can stay home are self-quarantined. I think it’s a good idea everyone print off the recipes because we will all be cooking with simple ingredients. Thank you for your kind words, I’m glad you are prepared with a freezer and pantry full of food. Stay well, my friend, Linda

      Reply
    • March 30, 2020 at 3:45 pm
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      Hi Carol, I forgot the buttermilk question: If you don’t have buttermilk, just add 1 tablespoon of white vinegar or lemon juice to one cup of milk. Now you have buttermilk. The buttermilk helps quick bread rise. Linda

      Reply
  • March 30, 2020 at 2:46 pm
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    Linda,
    o.k. I read your recipe over and over,so you don’t have to knead this bread? I have made bread for
    years but never made one that doesn’t need kneading. Wow that’s great but also takes away some
    “exercise”. HAHA.

    Reply
    • March 30, 2020 at 3:40 pm
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      Hi June, oh you can knead it but it’s a super sticky dough. Sprinkle some flour on the countertop and make a round ball to put the dough in the skillet. I wouldn’t call it kneading but just mounding it? It’s so darn easy to make, my grandkids can make it. Linda

      Reply
  • March 30, 2020 at 7:22 pm
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    5 stars
    My granddaughter needed to make a “Quick Bread” for 4H to enter in the county fair this coming summer . I saw your recipe and thought it was perfect. We had a blast making it today and everyone raves about how wonderful it tasted and the perfect texture. My b-in-l couldn’t believe it was made w/o yeast. Thank you so much for this recipe.

    Reply
    • March 31, 2020 at 9:39 am
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      HI Kathy, woohoo!! I’m so glad you made the soda bread! So many people cannot get yeast so I shared my recipe. I love your sweet comment! Linda

      Reply
  • April 15, 2020 at 8:35 pm
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    5 stars
    I plan on making this with the kids this week. I have been baking so many different types of bread since all of this began!

    Reply
    • April 16, 2020 at 8:21 am
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      Hi Jess, I love hearing this! The more we can teach our kids about making bread, they can survive the worst of times. Good job! Linda

      Reply

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