Whats In Your C.E.R.T. Bag

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What’s in your C.E.R.T. Bag? I decided to pull out the stuff I have accumulated in my own C.E.R.T. bag/backpack to show you today. My husband and I took a class to be C.E.R.T. certified in our community. It’s called Community Emergency Response Team. We called a few neighbors to do it with us. We could only talk 3 people into doing it with us.  Here’s the deal, I have no medical training but I can organize just about anything. I thought to myself if we could get twenty people to join us, our neighborhood would be in better shape than it was before the classes. Well, we have 5 people…..

The C.E.R.T. backpack on the left above is actually my bag. The one on the right is my C.E.R.T. emergency bag with supplies. My husband has his own bags which I will show another day. He carries the medical supplies. We both have several duplicate items because we might not be in the same area all the time. We have slowly added to the bags as our budget could afford the items.

Whats In Your C.E.R.T. Bag

Here are the contents in my backpack: C.E.R.T. book to log homes and people, different colors of tape to mark the assessment of the injured people (red=needs immediate help, yellow=delay/not immediate, green means they are ok to wait for assistance), hardhat, Berkey Sports Bottle for filtering water, goggles, headlamp, work gloves, and a 4 in 1 tool (shown below), C.E.R.T. vest, light sticks and scissors, N-95 masks. We all need to be aware of where to shut off our water, electricity and gas lines. We also need to know where to shut off our water inside our homes. Of course, we would never shut off gas unless we can smell gas….or a fire is coming our way…common sense needs to be used.

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Whats In Your C.E.R.T. Bag

Mark’s C.E.R.T. bag has all the medical supplies we will need until help arrives if it arrives. I am aware of 2 nurses and 2 doctors I believe in our neighborhood. Of course, I do not know everyone that lives in the subdivision. The items shown below are in my bag:

Whats In Your C.E.R.T. Bag

Nitrile gloves, N-95 masks (you can never have enough of them), BandAids, yellow chalk, yellow caution tape, paint sticks for makeshift splints.

We NEED to be able to take care of ourselves. We can’t always depend on our government or local authorities. They can only do so much. Let me give you some statistics for OUR area in Southern Utah. These statistics are a year old, but none the less please check out these numbers in my St. George, Utah (Washington County) area. We have on average 140,000 people living here. Washington County has 17 ambulances, 46 fire trucks, 204 police cars. We have two hospitals with 145 beds available. These numbers are scary….we cannot depend on anyone but ourselves. Please check out your local numbers. You might just be surprised…..or maybe not! You might want to Google “The Volunteer Protection Act of 1997”. Check it out for yourselves. C.E.R.T. classes

 

6 thoughts on “Whats In Your C.E.R.T. Bag

  • November 20, 2019 at 9:22 am
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    I thought that maybe your CERT bag would be filled with a long list of specialized items, but it’s really not much different than one might have in their own emergency kit except for the different colors of tape and the paper to write on.

    As long as people have first aid supplies, water, a few tools (Flashlights, lightsticks, cordage, axe or hatchet, crowbars, etc.) they can help someone. Oddly enough, it’s the very basic items that some people don’t even have on hand and ready to grab.

    I don’t want to tell a bunch of different stories, but there have been times where I thought to myself, I SHOULD have this or that with me, in the car or at home. And I think to myself that I should know better, but now I will know for next time and be prepared. This is the main lesson that preppers learn and the one mistake they try to avoid which is being caught unaware and unprepared.

    Incidentally, I called about a CERT class years ago and was never contacted. In the meantime, I learned in addition to CPR courses and such, the Red Cross now has first aid courses for pets. Maybe when finances allow I will take some courses.

    Reply
    • November 20, 2019 at 11:48 am
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      Hi Frank, it’s interesting the one big thing that we were taught taking the CERT classes is that someone has to be in charge after a disaster. Well, who should that be? An how do we label bodies, houses, etc? The other thing is what do we do with the hurt, we label the people as to priority. It was a great course, I learned some things I hadn’t thought of before. Linda

      Reply
    • December 5, 2020 at 6:01 pm
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      Frank i think its important to learn how to do things right so taking classes is a good way to learn and make new friends. As for the cert bag its self tells people that you know what you are doing so people in a panic will calm down and it will be safer for everyone.

      Reply
      • December 5, 2020 at 6:25 pm
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        Hi Helen, I agree with you. There is something calming when you have heard about CERT and then see someone with a CERT bag. Great comment, Linda

        Reply
      • December 5, 2020 at 8:27 pm
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        Yeah, well they dropped the ball here or the person who took my name and number lost it. I don’t know if you misunderstood what I was saying, but I was going to get into it and called about classes when I read they were being offered, but I was never contacted. That being the case, I still strive to be ready and prepared. And being that the kit is not highly specialized or expensive to build, it seems logical and prudent to include the same items either for personal use or maybe to support and assist others.

        CERT training or not, after years of caring for other people, and acting as the home nurse, It is my nature to help and do something to help. I’m not afraid to be untrained or inadequate, but I can’t just watch things happen regardless of what I know or have learned to do. I fear more the suffering of others as a result of not helping until professional help can come to their aid.

        My mother and my older brother (Passed away very recently) both relied heavily on me when they fell ill or were affected by the symptoms and side effects of their conditions. I would rather be scared and help than not do anything. Despite feeling scared, trying to help builds confidence and helps one to keep it together which means one can be more useful than if they allow fear to paralyze them.

        Reply
        • December 5, 2020 at 9:48 pm
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          Hi Frank, great comment. That’s really too bad the group that was setting up the training dropped the ball. Mark and I had a great experience with most of the classes, depending on who was teaching the class each night. You are so right if you can get the CERT manual you can do just about anything without having to take the classes. There were three different classes that I enjoyed very much. I was able to hold a fire hose and put out a small fire with the help of the Fire Department. We learned how to use the hose, not that we would have a hose to attach to a fire hydrant. But I did learn it is not that easy to put out a fire without knowing the right technique. We were in the gymnasium one night and the lights were out. It was very dark and the group had “staged” people, and bodies. That was a great training experience, how to build a triage. The other class was a doctor who told us how to talk to people with and without mental health issues. If you could get the manual you could do it all. I found this on Amazon. https://amzn.to/36M6In1 You have all the experience of having cared for family members for years. It looks like they have a download PDF for free but it has over 300 pages. Yikes! We cannot be afraid, we must help others as you said. Great comment, Frank! Linda

          Reply

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