What You Need In Your Hygiene Kit For Survival

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Maybe you have already thought what you would need in your hygiene kit for survival. I felt very strongly I needed to write this post today after the holidays. Yes, you can add one of these bags to your 72-hour kits or bug out bags.

I hope you already have one or two in every bag you have. My thoughts today are different based on a little trip I took up to Salt Lake City, Utah and caught the TRAX city transportation system from the airport to Sandy, Utah before Christmas. Here’s the deal, we have all taken city transportation system like buses, trolleys, trains, etc.

I was adamant that my daughter NOT come to pick up my husband and me at the airport. I REALLY wanted to learn how to make the transfers on TRAX in case I made the trip to her house on my own sometime in the future. We didn’t use the FrontRunner commuter train to get to Sandy, Utah but probably should have simply due to the time the TRAX light rail took to get to our destination. We are senior citizens and it cost $1.25 each to go 15 miles. What a bargain and we are helping save the planet from car emissions.

My husband and I observed many things on the TRAX system. It makes several stops and the weather was very cold and windy that day. As I write this post I am getting choked up with emotion because I do not normally see all the things I saw on that ride to Sandy, Utah. If you think about it the city, county or state are going to place these railway systems in places where the property is cheaper, in most cases.

The railway went through some really sad looking neighborhoods in some areas. I saw one house with a small window air conditioner and a pillowcase hanging above it waving in the wind as we passed by it. It was only 25 degrees that day. I’m talking cold, and it was snowing.

It seemed every time the railway stopped it appeared as if there were three to four homeless people hopping on when the doors opened. They would hop off at the next stop. Then some new homeless people hopped on and this started the cycle all over again. You may ask how I knew they were homeless?

I don’t know for sure, but they had large backpacks on their backs and thread barren jackets. Some had hats and gloves. Some had shoes that didn’t match. My heart sank as I watched these people get on and off. I’m assuming they did this to get warm from the outside blowing snow.

I think they possibly didn’t want to get caught for not paying. It took one hour and 15 minutes for the ride, so I had a lot of time to observe and watch. My husband and I were heading to our daughters for Christmas, to have parties, to visit friends and enjoy a warm home.

When I arrived back home I went to our supermarket and picked up enough stuff that I can deliver a bag filled with a few necessities to five homeless people. I wanted to keep the price under $50.00 total for everything. I am not rich by any means, but I hope to share five bags a month with the homeless in our local community.

I remember reading on Facebook that someone said: “I had no idea we have homeless people right here in St. George, Utah.” Yes, we do and I am proud to say I know a preacher that feeds dozens of them every Sunday at his church. He and his wife try to get donations from various sources, and the community does support them pretty well, but some of the food and paper goods come out of their own money.

His name is Jimi Kestin and his church is called Solomon’s Porch. If you live in Southern Utah they could use donations to help those less fortunate. He truly is one of God’s servants.

So that is my number one idea, to give a bag to some of the homeless people in your area. The other reason I want to show you today’s post is to let you make one or two bags of these every month for people who might have to come to your home AFTER a disaster. If we have an unforeseen emergency some people may become displaced and need to stay with us for a few days, or maybe even weeks.

Maybe we will have to evacuate our neighborhoods and go to the local schools or churches and it would be nice to be able to take some of these with us to hand out to those folks who came without the necessities. It would be awesome if we could all hand out a bag or two to those people who are not prepared for the unexpected. They could at least brush their teeth, shave, and have some other necessities they may need.

Emergency Hygiene Kit

What You Need In Your Hygiene Kit For Survival by FoodStorageMoms

Hygiene Kit Items:

  1. A mini first aid kit
  2. Toothbrush and toothpaste
  3. Deodorant
  4. Shampoo
  5. Lotion
  6. Bar of soap
  7. A razor
  8. Kleenex
  9. Lip protector
  10. Carol mentioned adding washcloths and baby wipes

I had hoped a quart bag would work for the hygiene kit, but I ended up having to use gallon bags, this is what they look like filled:

What You Need In Your Hygiene Kit For Survival by FoodStorageMoms

Keep in mind these are the minimum items people can use if they are homeless or if we need to have some people come to live in our homes after a disaster. I get that, but we need to think of others and try to do a little to help those less fortunate. May God bless you for your efforts. Let’s teach the world to be prepared for the unexpected.

First aid kits by Linda

FEMA Website Federal Emergency Management Agency

17 thoughts on “What You Need In Your Hygiene Kit For Survival

  • January 6, 2016 at 9:13 am
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    I love these, Linda! Your heart is truly in a great place! We live next door to a “thrift” store run by the local church that helps less fortunate people. It’s like a Goodwill, but the items are free. The church also provides a brown bag lunch to anyone that comes on Saturdays and Sundays. You’ve give me a great idea, to make some of these kits to hand out to those. I can only imagine that if they are unable to afford clothes and food, hygiene is on the back burner, understandably.

    I hope you had a great holiday!

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    • January 6, 2016 at 5:57 pm
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      Hi Savannah, oh that is so wonderful that your local thrift store/church hands out a brown bag lunch to those that need it! I love hearing these stories. I had a great holiday, I hope you did as well! Linda

      Reply
  • January 6, 2016 at 1:37 pm
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    Thank you for a gentle reminder in being prepared for those who may be in need of a basic, emergency hygiene kit. The gift that allows dignity to be preserved, is worth more than can be imagined.

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    • January 6, 2016 at 5:59 pm
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      Hi Mj Solis, it’s a basic kit but I had to keep the items within my budget. I agree with you on the dignity…we all need to feel clean and good about ourselves. I pray every day for those less fortunate people. Thanks for stopping by, Linda

      Reply
  • January 6, 2016 at 2:38 pm
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    small plastic baggie for the soap once it has been used, and a small washcloth-packets of baby wipes if giving out to homeless

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  • January 6, 2016 at 2:39 pm
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    plastic baggie for the soap once used; baby wipes packaged in small amounts

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    • January 6, 2016 at 6:01 pm
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      Hi Karen, I totally agree with the plastic baggie and baby wipes. I am going to go add this to my post. I had a budget of $50.00 so I had to choose those that fit in the budget but these two items would only have been another $1.00. Thanks so much, Linda

      Reply
  • January 6, 2016 at 4:21 pm
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    Brillant, Generous and Timely!!! As winter sets in, I’d add a mylar emergency blanket for the homeless and disaster bags. Also a comb and mark the bags Male or Female.

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    • January 6, 2016 at 6:02 pm
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      Hi Beth, this is so funny that you would mention a comb. I got home and thought to myself oh my goodness, they need a comb! The mylar blankets would be fabulous! I am going to go add your comments to my post. May God bless you, Linda

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    • January 6, 2016 at 8:49 pm
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      Hi Sam, oh that is a great idea! Thanks, I’m adding that to my post, thank you! Linda

      Reply
  • January 7, 2016 at 1:03 am
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    For a little over a year, I have kept three or four bags in my car at all times. I live in Kansas City. MO and work down town. You see people on the street corner with signs, when I stop at the light I just hand them a bag. The guys I work with bring me back the small bottles from the hotels when they travel. I went to a sporting event and one of the sponsors was handing out chap stick. I took one and my sister mentioned what I use them for. The man gave me a big sack full of them to give out. So, with this help I have been able to give out over a hundred bags. I also throw in a snack bar or two in my bags.
    I had one little man start crying. I told him it was ok, that was not that much. He said he was crying because somebody that did not even know him thought enough to make the bag for him. Yes, he made me cry also.

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    • January 7, 2016 at 7:37 pm
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      Hi Rose, great idea to gather the small shampoo bottles from hotels. I love the chapstick story, they handing you big sack full! We all need to give what we can to those who are less fortunate. This would me cry too! May God bless you for your efforts! Linda

      Reply
  • September 19, 2016 at 11:20 pm
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    We save the mini toothpaste tubes from the dentist for rough times. They accumulate pretty fast. Samples are pretty inexpensive. Note pads and pencils at the dollar store too. Resale shops for hats and gloves, sometimes they have other hygienic products. Goes to a good cause and the bags would be welcome there too.
    I also click to donate food, animal welfare, veterans Alzheimer research and other causes all at the greater good web site. Just bought a jacket from them that will also will generate support for rainforest protection as well as provide a second jacket to a needy person. They have decent quality items too.
    I’m going to click every day till the grid goes down!

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    • September 20, 2016 at 3:47 pm
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      Hi Allison, great idea about saving the mini toothpaste tubes from the dentist. It’s the little things in life like soap, toothpaste and a toothbrush that we sometimes take for granted. Great tip about donating to worthy causes! You rock! Linda

      Reply
  • September 27, 2017 at 1:09 pm
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    Maybe add a washcloth or small package of wet wipes. Again, Dollar Tree where everything costs a Dollar:-) We accept the small bottles of personal care items at “my’ food pantry (I’m the local coordinator). You know, all of those little bottles that we collect from hotels/motels. I do also bring in standard sized bottles.

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    • September 27, 2017 at 5:49 pm
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      Hi Carol, I’m going to go add washcloths and wipes to the post, it’s great to have anything we can reuse after washing and drying it. Wet wipes are great because you can add water if they become dry. Thank you, Linda

      Reply

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