How To Freeze Tomatoes

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

This is a tip on how to freeze your excess crop of tomatoes from your garden. I’m showing you something I learned from my daughter, Heidi. We both grow tomatoes in our gardens. She said to me one day that she just puts some tomatoes in her blender and blends them until they are smooth, no peeling.

Yes, I said no peeling, no blanching!!! I did this last year and I LOVED having a few tomatoes that I could just blend or grind up and freeze. You thaw them a day or two before needing them and you have tomatoes ready to go.

MY LATEST VIDEOS
MY LATEST VIDEOS

Update, now I freeze tomatoes without blending as well. Yep, I remove the stem, quarter and freeze them in bags. THEN I thaw them a day or two before I will use them and blend them until smooth. You know we are all busy sometimes, just throw them in a bag and freeze them to make chili or your favorite tomato-based soup on another day. After thawing, if you blend them in a blender you don’t taste the skins of the tomatoes. Easy peasy.

We all have a few extra tomatoes sometimes just after we have finished canning a huge batch. Maybe it’s one or two jars worth. I’m not canning only one or two jars. And we can only eat so many bacon, lettuce, and tomato sandwiches. Okay, I decided I would show you how easy this is to do. You pick the tomatoes, wash and remove stems.

How To Freeze Tomatoes

They can be large tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, Roma tomatoes, etc. You will not blanch or peel the tomatoes. Place the tomatoes in your blender and blend until smooth. Place the liquid in the jars leaving enough space for the liquid to freeze and expand, that’s it! Love it!

If you are wondering about those white lids shown below, they are made by “Ball”. I have regular and wide mouth lids. Ball Wide-Mouth Plastic Storage Caps, 8-Count, and Ball Regular Mouth Jar Storage Caps Set of 8

I would not freeze my entire tomato crop this way, just a few odds, and ends that we have extra from the garden. I need to make one disclaimer here. When I was little my mother thought a jar of canned tomatoes would be our dinner, you know canned tomatoes with milk.

Nope, I still will not eat that. I still prefer Campbell’s Tomato Soup, with milk and saltines! I only use my canned or frozen tomatoes for vegetable soups, sauces, spaghetti, etc. I guess it’s a Linda and Heidi thing…..LOL!

How To Freeze Tomatoes

How To Use Those Tomatoes

1. makes fabulous chili

2. yummy bean soups

3. enchiladas

4. hamburger soup

5. vegetable soups

6. spaghetti sauce

7. taco soup

8. my mother’s tomato soup

9. make my own tomato sauce

10 pizza sauce

My favorite things to freeze my excess crop of tomatoes:

Prepworks by Progressive Canning Funnel for Regular and Wide Mouth Jars

Ball Mason Jars Wide-Mouth Can or Freeze – 16 oz 12pk

1pt Ball Mason Jars – Case of 12

My friends over at Our Stoney Acres-Freezing Tomatoes

Subscribe To My Posts:

13 thoughts on “How To Freeze Tomatoes

  • July 1, 2016 at 8:34 am
    Permalink

    Great advice! Thank you – this is much needed as we for sure will have excess tomatoes this year and are venturing into our first season of canning. If you have any pasta sauce or salsa recipes for canning – I would love to see them! 🙂

    Reply
    • July 3, 2016 at 11:49 am
      Permalink

      HI Savannah, I love to see canning jars lined up on shelves. I’m on the road today but I will send you the link to the only website I trust for canning recipes. I’m a safety chick! Linda

      Reply
  • July 1, 2016 at 10:35 am
    Permalink

    “Freeze” jars?!?
    GASP!!
    I was always under the impression that one should never, EVER, place a jar of any liquid in the freezer to, well, freeze, since there is the risk of the jar fracturing during either the freeze or thaw cycle.
    Linda, I’m not picking nits but surely don’t want to risk bottle, product or safety.
    But you and others HAVE successfully done this with no deleterious effects?
    If you say it’s possible, I will believe your word and give it a try.
    Thank you for your efforts to create your site for us out here.
    I have, and continue to, learn SO much about a dizzying variety of subjects that it boggles my mind.
    Having been a prepper for over 4 decades, I’m STILL astonished about the things I DON’T know and am learning, so thank you very much.
    My only regret is that I didn’t learn to and start canning about 30 years or more EARLIER!!

    Reply
    • July 3, 2016 at 11:47 am
      Permalink

      Hi Howard, I think we all learn things from each other, that’s why I write and hope people share their tips with me to pass them on. I have used Ball canning jars for years to freeze soups, broths, chili, tomatoes, etc. You must leave at least one inch at the top to let the food expand or you may have broken jars. Keep in prepping Howard, we need the world to do the same, Linda

      Reply
  • July 1, 2016 at 1:16 pm
    Permalink

    I have this very same thing with leftover chicken broth from a baking hen.

    Reply
    • July 3, 2016 at 11:44 am
      Permalink

      Hi Bonnie, I’m glad to hear we are all using those fabulous Ball jars to preserve whatever excess food we have. Chicken broth is fabulous! Linda

      Reply
  • July 1, 2016 at 7:10 pm
    Permalink

    I use Ball glass jars to freeze soups, bone broth, and pretty much anything liquid that I have too much of. The key is to make sure you leave space for the expansion of the liquid as it freezes.

    Reply
    • July 3, 2016 at 11:43 am
      Permalink

      Hi Melissa, I use Ball glass jars to freeze all kinds of soups. You are so right about needing to leave enough space at the top of the jar for the soup, tomatoes or whatever to expand. Linda

      Reply
  • July 1, 2016 at 7:53 pm
    Permalink

    I do hope to have some tomatoes from my garden if only the little buggers would set! If they do, I will definitely be using this advice. Thank you for the info about the plastic lids for the canning jars – didn’t know they existed. If glass seems risky to some people, the tomatoes or blended tomatoes could be packaged with a Food Saver.

    Reply
    • July 3, 2016 at 11:41 am
      Permalink

      HI Ellen, I’ve had a tough time this year with tomatoes setting as well! I planted them and the weather stayed cold way too long. Then overnight bam, it was hot. I only use the Ball jars to freeze I wonder if that’s why some people have had them break because they were not the stronger jars, not sure. Linda

      Reply
  • July 2, 2016 at 8:17 pm
    Permalink

    I have done this before, but I freeze them in ice cube trays. Once they are frozen, I break them out and put them in freezer bags. Then when I want some fresh tomatoes in my cooking, I just throw in however many I want and no need to thaw.

    Reply
    • July 3, 2016 at 11:39 am
      Permalink

      Oh my gosh, I love this idea!!!! I have got to add this to my post, I love the ice cube idea! Thank you, Linda

      Reply
  • July 3, 2016 at 11:34 pm
    Permalink

    When I was young, I helped my mother peel, slice peaches into a big bowl, add sugar, stir to dissolve the sugar, and put them into glass jars & into the freezer. Mama’s freezer, way back then. was really neat!! It was divided into shelves just taller than a quart jar & we just had to set them in there, with some space between the jars (while they froze). Of course we left over 1″ of headspace to keep the jars from breaking. Thanks for reminding me of this wonderful way to do food!!!
    LOVE THE ICE CUBE TRAY IDEA, TOO!!!! Thanks
    Appreciate all the help that you give and keeping me up on the new items to use.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *