What Will I Feed My Family After A Disaster

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Do you sometimes wonder “what will I feed my family after a disaster?” Let’s assume we will not leave our home, so we would eat what is in our house today. This is not about 72 hour kits or bug out bags. Do you have a supply of paper plates, cups and silverware? Yes, we can wash our regular dishes,but what if we have no power to heat the dish water? I don’t want to use up all my fuel to boil water, so I stash a few plates, cups, bowls and silverware for any unforeseen disaster.

I saw a post about planning for food after a disaster that my friend, Julene wrote over at Prepare Today about “Post Disaster Meals..No Cooking Required”. She actually wrote it back in October, 2012. She has been a good friend of mine and inspires the world with ideas on food storage and preparedness. I decided that not all my readers would have seen her post so I am writing one similar to her post today.

So let’s get started. I want to break this out in three sections, breakfasts, lunches and lunch/dinners. Of course you will know what foods your family can and cannot eat. These are just examples to help you get started and think about what you might need after a disasater or unforeseen emergency. One thing we must all have is water. In my opinion we can never have too much water. I am talking about drinkable water first and other water needs second for personal hygeine and cooking. Today I am only planning BREAKFAST Meals.

After A Disaster Breakfast Number One:

Planning For Food After A Disaster-be prepared for the unexpected by FoodStorageMoms.com

My first breakfast choice is pancakes with syrup and freeze dried fruit (apples and straberries). I am thinking more than likely after a disaster we will have some fresh fruit in the refrigerator. Most of us have cans of fruit or jars of fruit we have canned. If I have some eggs in the refrigerator I would use them up if it appears the disaster could be longer than a few days. This is assuming you have a gas barbeque or butane stove. I would highly recommend getting one with some extra cans of butane fuel. I used one for almost six weeks (used only one can of butane). I used my SunOven as well as a Dutch oven to prepare meals when I was stove/ovenless (is that a word?) for almost 6 or 7 weeks. LOL!

After A Disaster Breakfast Number Two:

Planning For Food After A Disaster-be prepared for the unexpected by FoodStorageMoms.com

Most of us have some kind of oatmeal in our food storage, so this is good one to make for breakfast. It’s really easy to prepare with just some boiling water, add some fruit and you are good to go. This is my favorite Cox’s Honey that you can use to sweeten your oatmeal, if desired. If you have milk to use up in the refrigerator you can pour some over the oatmeal. If not, I would recommend a #10 can of instant milk if you do not have animals to provide the milk you want. I don’t drink milk, but my husband will want some cereal so I always have several #10 cans of instant milk or the boxed shelf stable Gossner’s milk shown below. One great thing about oatmeal is you can add nuts, craisins, raisins and freeze dried fruit of most any kind. Easy peasy…

After A Disaster Breakfast Number Three:

Planning For Food After A Disaster-be prepared for the unexpected by FoodStorageMoms.com

You probably know me by now, I keep a lot of cold cereal in my pantry. Yes, people look at me at the store when it goes on sale…like really??? You eat that much cereal??? Yes my husband does. Life is good with cereal, milk, bananas and the newspaper to read every morning. The less I have to go to a grocery store the better….

After A Disaster Breakfast Number Four:

Planning For Food After A Disaster-be prepared for the unexpected by FoodStorageMoms.com

Here is a picture of cold cereal, my favorite instant milk and freeze dried bananas. I want you to be aware of the different milk products you can buy. Most grocery stores sell instant milk. This particualr company’s instant milk product has a shelf life of 25 years unopened and 2 years if opened. The storage temperature would have to be cool (not a hot garage). If you use soy or rice milk stock up some extra ones in case you need them. Plus, most are shelf stable..even better no refrigeration necessary. Here again, a friendly reminder to store water…lots of water.

The reason I put this post together is to make us think about what we have in our houses today to feed our a family for a week, two weeks or more. Of course, I would love fresh vegetables from the garden, but with temperatures of 30 degrees at night right now and for the rest of the winter months, that is not possible. If I can’t drive to the store because the roads have washed away or an extreme ice storm is coming..I will be calm and relaxed knowing I can prepare several meals for my family. Tomorrow I will share planning LUNCH Meals, the day after that will be planning DINNER Meals. Of course, all meals can be switched around, I just wanted to give you pictures to help you plan meals. Hopefully you will see that you have most of these items in your pantry right ready to go.

Last winter the weather was brutal everywhere….please be prepared for the unexpected. Blessings to you all.

10 thoughts on “What Will I Feed My Family After A Disaster

  • November 19, 2014 at 7:44 am
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    I woke this morning to my alarm going off right before our power went out. Thankfully it was only for 3 hours but I realized that some of the things I do to prepare are working. Everyone has a working flashlight by their bed. I can make coffee without the power being on by manually lighting the gas burner on the stove, boiling water and then using a french press. I know how to make a fire to keep warm.

    Reply
    • November 19, 2014 at 10:44 am
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      Hi Jamie, I love hearing the things you are doing to prepare are working! WooHoo! I recently got a gas stove and I am so thankful for it to use when we lose power!! Blessings..Linda

      Reply
  • November 19, 2014 at 11:16 am
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    A few years ago, we had a bad storm and many of the power poles were blown down. We were without power for 4 days. We were lucky to have a propane stove. I keep an old fashioned percolator in the cupboard to make our morning coffee and I made hot chocolate for our two teen aged girls. Our biggest problem was how cold it was in the morning. We would start up our kerosene heater in the middle of our family room to get the house warmed up a bit and we kept all the doors to bedrooms closed so we could keep what heat we had in just the family/dining room and living room. Cooking on the stove kept the kitchen somewhat warm. We all wore layers of warm clothes.

    We were lucky that we could drive into town to buy blocks of ice to keep the refrigerator cold. We didn’t open the freezer until the 3rd day and we were surprised to find that the food was still partially frozen. We had kept it in the garage and it was really cold out.

    We had plenty of food in the pantry and refrigerator and since we homeschooled our girls, they were kept busy working on their schoolwork.

    It wasn’t a fun experience, but I know we could make it through a longer period of time. I think of it as a “dry run” for if there was a really bad situation.

    Reply
    • November 19, 2014 at 11:24 am
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      Hi Donna, thanks for sharing your dry run experience. I am so glad you were prepared to feed your family. No power for 4 days is a long time…..great comment! Linda

      Reply
  • November 20, 2014 at 10:03 am
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    Ever since my first emergency experience I’ve been interested in being prepared. Your site is chock full of handy info.

    Back in the 1980’s I cooked in a remote camp that had run out of fuel for the generator at the same time the road was washed out and we were stuck with a full freezer of food. I immediately rearranged the freezer so that each layer had a good selection of items to reduce the amount of time needed to rummage later. Then I insulated the freezer as well as I could with all sorts of blankets, branches, tarps and whatnot. As each layer was used I covered the remaining items inside the freezer with insulating layers as well. I managed to feed our 10 person camp and a couple of neighbours for a week until we got fuel again and only had to throw out 1 bag of frozen vegetables that was too far gone even for soup. Luckily our stove was propane powered, the freezer was outside and it was only early spring, not summer.

    Any time I went camp cooking after that I made sure I had my own emergency supplies of dehydrated foods and I did have to use them several times. I also never relied completely on other people’s assurances that “everything has been supplied” and insisted on seeing the inventories for myself. And I never, ever let the fuel supply get that low before refilling, whether it was my responsibility or not. I also learned the best way to keep grumpy workers from total rebellion is making sure the food is good, the cookie jar is full and staying cheerful myself.

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    • November 21, 2014 at 10:08 am
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      HI Alice, thanks for your comments..I am the person in my family that makes sure we have enough fuel, etc. Great idea to take your own dehydrated supplies on that camp out! I guess we need to be the one that makes sure we have enough of everything…I always say better more than not enough..Linda

      Reply
  • November 20, 2014 at 7:02 pm
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    Thanks for the ideas, it’s always important to keep these things on hand. My concern is always cleaning the pots and pans when the power goes out & we have no water. This is why for breakfast I have cereal (your husband isn’t the only one who eats lots of it) and the instant oatmeal. My son loves a certain type of oatmeal so I have 3-4 boxes on hand at all times – just in case.

    Reply
    • November 21, 2014 at 8:58 am
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      Andi, thats why I keep suggesing a butane stove, the fuel goes really far. You could boil water to use hot water to wash pots and pans.I have a lot oatmeal. We all need to share ideas to help people be warre for the unexpected. Thanks Andi, Linda

      Reply

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