35 Last Minute Ways To Prepare For An Emergency

  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 501
  •  
  •  
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

I have a friend who has a daughter living in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. She called me and asked what her daughter may need at the last minute in the event they are evacuated. Well, they were evacuated yesterday. Here comes Hurricane Florence, it’s a category 4 right now. It may become a category 5, oh my gosh!

MY LATEST VIDEOS

This means 140 miles an hour wind, excessive rainfall to name just a few things. Are we nervous for the Carolinas? Oh yes, we are. We are praying for all those living in and around that area. This could be the worst storm in 60 years according to what I have seen on the television.

I started typing a few things in an email for her daughter and this is what I sent her. I’m hoping some readers go get some of these things if they are still on the fence post whether or not to evacuate. AND if the items are still available in any of their local stores.

These items are actually good for anyone going forward to be prepared for the unexpected. You can never have too many preps, right? Let me know what you would add to this list, I love hearing from you.

35 Last Minute Ways To Prepare

  1. Fill your gas tank. I saw on TV that some gas stations had lines of 60 cars long, please keep your tank full or at least 3/4 full whenever possible.
  2. Cash, small bills (ATM’s may not work when power is off).
  3. Turn your frig and freezer to a colder setting and keep the doors closed if you lose power.
  4. Space in your freezer? Then fill zip-lock bags with water to fill in empty space in your freezer.
  5. Charge ALL your electronic devices and keep them charged.
  6. Put together an emergency contact list with names, phone numbers, and emails.
  7. Gather up important documents and place them in a secure binder.
  8. Get prescriptions filled (90 days if possible).
  9. Secure a hand can opener.
  10. Be ready to help your neighbors.
  11. Make a few meals and snacks that you can store without power.
  12. Do ALL your laundry NOW.
  13. Pick up a solar phone charger.
  14. Secure batteries for your flashlights (better yet get a solar flashlight).
  15. If you use oxygen, prepare to leave and get backups needed.
  16.  Get gas for your chainsaw, you may need it.
  17. Have hand sanitizer and baby wipes available and ready to use.
  18. If you have N-95 masks locate them so you can use them if needed.
  19.  Store water in buckets to use in the toilet.
  20. Take pictures of every room and closet in your home. Don’t forget your garage too.
  21. You can use the water heater water as long as your water is not contaminated. Turn off the intake valve and use the spigot on the front of the tank.
  22. Invite your family over or any elderly neighbors you have.
  23. Put together an emergency toilet if the water lines are shut off.  Make a toilet with a large garbage bag, duct tape, and kitty litter. Yes, store lots of black garbage bags, you will need them.
  24. Put an extra pair of glasses in your 72-hour kit if you need to evacuate.
  25. Fill large containers with water and secure lids so kids do not fall in them.
  26. Have LOTS of non-perishables on hand to eat and snack on.
  27. Make a cake today and serve it after the storm hits and leaves.
  28. Get a radio so you can hear what’s going on (the TV may lose power so your radio with batteries will be awesome).
  29. If you have invested in a rain barrel you can use the water to flush toilets or for mini baths with rags.
  30. Put together a plan to evacuate if the city officials suggest you leave.
  31. Be sure and stock up on pet food and make them a 72-hour kit with food, food dishes, vaccination records, extra leash, and harness.
  32. Grab some of those yard solar lights, they are great to bring into your home each night and they recharge with the sun.
  33. Make an evacuation list of all the critical things you don’t want to leave behind if you are evacuated.
  34. Store water, at least four-gallons per person per day. Have some containers you can grab and go with.
  35. Stock up on paper plates, paper cups, and plastic silverware.
  36. Janet:  I read this somewhere, and can’t remember where to give credit. Put a small plastic container with water in to freeze. Then, put a penny on top. If you come home, and the penny is no longer on top, assume your food is not good to eat.
  37. Kay: Be aware that you may not be able to come home for DAYS! Freeways and roads into cities will be closed by authorities until the area is deemed safe. Be prepared for cars to overheat, bring car tools, and bring a paper map! We tried country back road after backroad trying to dodge huge traffic jams that day and couldn’t have done it with just a phone GPS. If you evacuate – take your food and water WITH you. Cities 100 miles or more away will be swamped with evacuees and those stores will also run out of some basics such as water, bread, and milk! (Seen it!) Plus if you happen to get stranded your family will have supplies.
  38. Leanne: Back up your computer hard drive(s) to an external drive that you can carry with you; keep a list of doctors, medications, etc., in your wallet – I typed mine out so that I could just have my medical providers attach it to my file – it includes not only current issues but also family health history – for my wallet, I shrunk the font down about as far as I could (and still see it!) so that it fits on 2 pages.
  39. Sideliner 1950: From the Maui News, ahead of Tropical Storm Olivia: “Smoking and drinking alcohol are not allowed at evacuation centers or in parking lots. All pets entering a pet-friendly facility will need to be in a pet carrier or cage. Owners must provide food and water.”
Read More of My Articles  Car Emergency Kit

Please pray for all the people involved in and around Hurricane Florence. Please suggest to your neighbors to be prepared with several of these last-minute emergency items. You’ll be glad you did. May God bless this world.

Copyright pictures:

Ambulance: AdobeStock_129849909 by Biker3

Subscribe To My Posts:

18 thoughts on “35 Last Minute Ways To Prepare For An Emergency

  • September 12, 2018 at 7:32 am
    Permalink

    These are excellent and I would have never thought of many of them— thank you!

    Reply
    • September 12, 2018 at 8:55 am
      Permalink

      Hi Carrie, oh I’m so glad you can use some of these ideas. Be safe, Linda

      Reply
  • September 12, 2018 at 7:44 am
    Permalink

    Hi Linda
    My sister and her family are in Myrtle Beach and she just said Hurricane Florence has been downgraded to a Cat 2. Of course that can change, but we are praying it doesn’t. I have been giving my sister a lot of your suggestions on how to be ready for a weather issue. I’m glad she was able to follow so much of your info and is in good shape to survive this storm. Thank you for teaching us what to do and when.
    Always,
    Laura

    Reply
    • September 12, 2018 at 8:57 am
      Permalink

      Hi Laura, oh this is good news if it stays at a Category 2. I’m so glad your sister is prepared and will survive this storm. Blessings to you both, Linda

      Reply
  • September 12, 2018 at 8:43 am
    Permalink

    Wonderful list, I have one to add. I read this somewhere, and can’t remember where to give credit. Put a small plastic container with water in to freeze. Then, put a penny on top. If you come home, and the penny is no longer on top, assume your food is not good to eat.

    Reply
    • September 12, 2018 at 8:57 am
      Permalink

      Hi Janet, oh my gosh I remember hearing about the penny deal as well. Thank you for reminding me, I’m posting this. Awesome! Linda

      Reply
  • September 12, 2018 at 9:24 am
    Permalink

    Linda, we lived near Gaveston, Texas for 30 years and dealt with many storms. Here’s a few tips – 1) If you evacuate – take your food and water WITH you. Cities 100 miles or more away will be swamped with evacuees and those stores will also run out of some basics such as water, bread, and milk! (Seen it!) Plus if you happen to get stranded your family will have supplies. 2) Be aware you could be stuck in traffic. Once when evacuating, a 4 hour trip took us 12 hours! Be prepared for cars to overheat, bring car tools, and bring a paper map! We tried country back road after backroad trying to dodge huge traffic jams that day and couldn’t have done it with just a phone GPS. Right at the end of that trip our car did overheat but we arrived safely. 3) Unplug everything you can before you leave your home. If the power goes out there can be power surges as they work to get it back on. To tell if power to your fridge/freezer went out you can place an ice cube on a saucer in the freezer. If it melts/re-freezes in a puddle you will know your power was out for at least 24 hours and you will you need to throw out your food in the freezer/fridge. 4) Be aware that you may not be able to come home for DAYS! Freeways and roads into cities will be closed by authorities until the area is deemed safe. (And to prevent looters.) 5) Keep track of your local police department Facebook posts. They will tell you when it’s safe to come home. But be aware when you come home the power can still be out for quite a while. After Hurricane Ike we had no power for 11 days! 6) Bring plenty of clothes and things to entertain kids – don’t assume you’ll be back right away. 7) Rising water WILL kill you. Don’t chance it! Be safe everyone!

    Reply
    • September 12, 2018 at 9:48 am
      Permalink

      Hi Kay, wow, your comment is awesome! You have lived through evacuations firsthand!!! I hope everyone reads your comment! I’m adding several of your ideas to the post today. Thank you so much!! Linda

      Reply
  • September 12, 2018 at 3:30 pm
    Permalink

    Linda ~ As always, a great post. Love the comments about the penny and ice cube test for your freezer. We don’t lose power very often where I am but those are great tips if a storm is on its way. You never know. I am fortunate that I am on the same power grid as a hospital and many medical facilities so we are generally the first to get our power back on if it does go out.

    It is always a good idea to have a well stocked bug out bag in the event of necessary evacuations. I have 3 bags I grab and go with – a back pack, a duffel bag, and a rolling suit case. I have water, food and other necessary survival items spread between the three. The duffel bag can fit on my suit case so I only have to use one hand to maneuver. I also have clothing appropriate for the season in my bags.

    I certainly wish that I could take everything that is important to me but some things are just not worth the extra weight/capacity of those 3 bags.

    Some things I would add to your post: back up your computer hard drive(s) to an external drive that you can carry with you; keep a list of doctors, medications, etc., in your wallet – I typed mine out so that I could just have my medical providers attach it to my file – it includes not only current issues but also family health history – for my wallet, I shrunk the font down about as far as I could (and still see it!) so that it fits on 2 pages.

    Reply
    • September 12, 2018 at 6:28 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Leanne, I love hearing about the three bags. I have two bags. We can’t possibly put everything in one bag, right??? LOL! Thanks for your tips, I’m adding them to the post right now! Thank you so much!!! Linda

      Reply
  • September 12, 2018 at 4:11 pm
    Permalink

    Linda,
    How timely this post is! Not only for the Carolinas and other close by states, but for Hawaii as well. Would love to have Leanne spell out what she puts in her 3 bug out bags. THANKS big time to you, Linda, for sharing all your ideas. LOVE THEM!!!

    Reply
    • September 12, 2018 at 6:32 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Joanne!!! I think what Leanne is saying she has three bags and puts certain things in the different bags because you can’t possibly carry everything in one bag. I can’t speak for her but I have most of my “stuff” in my 72-hour bag, and food in another bag. It’s great to hear from you, my friend. Linda

      Reply
    • September 12, 2018 at 9:45 pm
      Permalink

      Joanne:
      Backpack has first aid, water, survival bars, masks, gloves, and various things like that; duffel bag has clothing; pistol (which if I bug out will go in hiding on my body), ammo and gun related needs; rolling bag carries more clothing (bulkier items), books (Bible, novel, word search), cards, more food and water, extra “protection” from the elements (a small tarp – I think it is 5′ X 5′), rope, rope tying card.

      This is not a comprehensive list. I don’t want the back pack to be too heavy! I also have in all three, copies of important papers. I put the copies at the very bottom of the bags so they are not easily accessible. I have been thinking of hiding them in a false pocket or bottom so that if a bag is stolen or lost, those papers are not easily found. I will, in my purse, (cross body only) have a copy or the originals of the most needed papers: medical, ID, SS card, etc.

      It all takes thought, however, and now that fall is upon us, it is time for me to get those bags out and re-assess what I have in there. Perhaps it is also the time to devise a false pocket/bottom for those paper copies.

      Oh – all of the copies I have have been put in pretty tiny print/size for less bulk.

      Reply
      • September 13, 2018 at 7:51 am
        Permalink

        Leanne, thank you so much for breaking down how you put your preps together. Great comment!!! Linda

        Reply
  • September 13, 2018 at 9:36 am
    Permalink

    From the Maui News, ahead of Tropical Storm Olivia:

    “Smoking and drinking alcohol are not allowed at evacuation centers or in parking lots. All pets entering a pet friendly facility will need to be in a pet carrier or cage. Owners must provide food and water.”

    Remember to prepare on behalf of your pets.

    Reply
    • September 13, 2018 at 10:12 am
      Permalink

      Hi Sideliner, thank you for this awesome comment! I’m adding it to my post!!! Thank you so much! Linda

      Reply
  • September 13, 2018 at 11:30 am
    Permalink

    Linda… I LOVE your posts to keep us reminded of the absolute necessity of being prepared. I think we have a good amount of storage but I worry most about the water. We have two 75 gallon tanks plus hot tub water if necessary. I can’t wrap my mind around how to store a large volume of water for drinking, bathing, etc. I’ve never actually seen how others store water and this would be so helpful to me… getting a visual of what to have and how to store…rotation and keeping it clean. I could sure use some ideas on this and photos so I can get a visual. Thank you so much!

    Reply
    • September 13, 2018 at 11:38 am
      Permalink

      Hi, Deb, you are so nice, thank you!! I have several posts on my website that shows how I store water. Here is one of them I wrote a couple of days ago. I have several posts on my website besides this one. https://www.foodstoragemoms.com/calculate-your-water-needs-for-survival/ If you type in Water or Water Storage, I have several pictures in posts because I am a visual person as well. Let me know if you have trouble finding them. Linda

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *