Peach Facts: What You May Not Know

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Peaches are a flavorful fruit from the peach tree that is native to the Northwest China region. Although they were originally found growing in China, peaches are now readily available around the world. While you may know that this fruit tastes good on its own, or when added to smoothies and fruit bowls, there are a lot of things you might not know about this incredible fruit. So if you want to know more about peach facts, you’re in the right spot!

In case you missed this post, How To Make An Easy Peach Glaze

Peach Facts: What You May Not Know

Peach Facts To Know

How Many Varieties of Peaches Exist?

Most people don’t realize that there are dozens of peach varieties in existence! It’s the reason why some taste sweeter than others. Believe it or not, there are more than 2000 varieties worldwide, with at least 30+ varieties available in the United States. These are a few of the popular varieties that you might’ve tasted before.

Yellow Peaches

Yellow peaches are, by far, one of the most popular types of peaches in existence. The skin is thin and has a slightly fuzzy texture, but you can still eat it all and enjoy every bite. Although they’re known as yellow peaches, they can have light red, pink, and even orange hues. If you want to bite into a juicy peach, this is a great option.

Peach Facts: What You May Not Know

Donut Peaches

Donut peaches get their name because of their flat appearance. Although they tend to look more like mini pumpkins because of their shape, they’re sweet and delicious. These peaches have a bit of an almond flavor that pairs well with their naturally sweet taste. When you like to eat sweeter fruits, this variety is an excellent choice.

White Peaches

White peaches aren’t nearly as acidic as yellow peaches, but they still provide a great taste. In addition, they have a slightly sweet and slightly floral flavor that makes them a great addition to fruit salads with berries, chopped apples, and other fresh ingredients.

Please do not “can” white flesh peaches. I quote Penn State Extension, “White-fleshed peaches have a natural pH above 4.6, which makes them a low-acid food; therefore, water bath or atmospheric steam canning will not destroy harmful bacteria in white peaches. Freezing is the recommended method of preservation for white peaches. Jun 30, 2020″

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Clingstone Peaches

The clingstone peach is tasty and perfect for eating on the spot. These peaches don’t do as well when used to prepare baked goods, but they’re still worth buying. If you like to grab a peach to eat while on the go, this is the perfect kind.

Of course, plenty of other peaches are available and easy to find in different places, such as the grocery store and farmer’s markets. If you love the fruit, it’s good to know of these different varieties.

You can begin trying the different types of peaches and then make a list of your favorites. When you know which ones are your favorites, you can buy them from the store or grow them at home to make sure you don’t run out.

More Peach Facts

Which Peach Is the Sweetest?

Of all the different peach varieties available, the donut peach is known for having the sweetest taste. Some people might even consider such a sweet taste as slightly sour, but that makes this fruit variety taste so great.

You can add it to smoothies with other ingredients, such as fresh spinach and mashed bananas. The sweetness of the peach will give your smoothie the perfect flavor. You wouldn’t need to add any extra sugar or other types of sweeteners to the beverage!

How Long Does It Take to Grow Peaches?

Once the flowers on a peach tree get pollinated, it takes at least three months to harvest them. Three months is the minimum, and it can take up to five months before you can harvest peaches to eat. It’s normal for peaches to be ready for harvest in the warmer summer months. The average peach tree will continue to produce fruit for at least ten years, with most producing peaches each year for up to 12 years.

Is It Challenging to Grow Peaches?

If peaches are your favorite fruit, you might wonder if it’s challenging to grow them at home. It’s a process that requires both effort and commitment. If you’re willing to put forth the effort involved in watering the tree, providing regular feedings, pruning tree branches, and keeping pests away, you can grow these peaches with no problem. However, if you don’t have the time to commit to caring for a peach tree, you should consider buying them at a grocery store or a farmer’s market.

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How Do You Clean Peaches?

It’s a good idea to clean your peaches before you eat them to get rid of any dirt, germs, or bacteria.. The best way to clean peaches is to fill a large plastic bowl with two cups of cold water and a teaspoon of vinegar. Place the peaches into the bowl and allow them to soak in the water with vinegar for 15 minutes. Next, remove the peaches from the bowl and then hold them under the faucet while continuing to allow the cold water to run over them, brushing anything off of the peaches that you might see. It’s that simple. Once you’ve washed the peaches, you can put them in your fridge to keep them cold and fresh, or place them on the countertop. It’s been my experience that they’ll last longer in the fridge. If you’re anxious to have them ripen faster then the countertop might be your best option.

Things You Can Do With Peaches

While peaches are great to eat for breakfast or a quick snack in the middle of the day, you can do so much more with them. You can slice them, freeze them, and then add them to your blender to prepare smoothies. You might want to add fresh chunks of peaches to your oatmeal or cereal in the morning. Peaches are a great ingredient to use when baking different foods. You can make peach pie, peach cobbler, and even a sweet peach loaf bread!

Mark loves peaches, and his favorite option is to slice them into a cereal bowl and pour milk on top. Depending on the variety of peach, he may or may not feel the need to add a little sugar. He also loves fresh peach pie! He’s pretty easy to please.

Final Word

Now that you know more about peach facts, you may pay closer attention to the different varieties available at big-box stores, local grocery stores, and the farmer’s markets that you like to visit. You can stock up on peaches or even decide to grow a peach tree in your backyard if you have the time to maintain it. May God Bless this world, Linda

17 thoughts on “Peach Facts: What You May Not Know

  • July 26, 2021 at 7:21 am
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    Linda,

    We have two yellow, freestone, dwarf peach trees, but only one of them is a reliable producer. Those who would grow their own peaches should know they’ll need to put bird netting over the trees if they want to eat any of the fruit. Otherwise the birds will get them all. Also, I”ve found it’s a good idea to put chicken wire or hardware “cloth” fencing up to keep ground squirrels and rabbits from munching on the fruits or bark. In deer/raccoon country you’ll need a higher fence. As with any other fruit tree, providing adequate water while the fruits are swelling, fertilizing at least twice a year and proper soil pH are critical to getting a good crop. Also, spraying with Neem oil or another honeybee safe insecticide such as Monterey Horticultural Oil will be required if your tree gets infected with thrips.

    The one thing I’ve never been successful at is ripening store bought peaches. I’ve tried putting them on the window sill and in paper bags and even in bags with a banana but they always seem to rot before getting eating sweet. Anyone have any good tips on this process?

    Reply
    • July 26, 2021 at 9:35 am
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      Hi Ray, oh, I’m so glad you mentioned this. I had Mark pick up some peaches from Walmart, my least favorite store. They never did ripen, they sat on the countertop for 2 weeks. I couldn’t peel them, literally could not peel them. They had a little fuzz so I knew they were supposed to be peaches, not nectarines. I literally hate wasting my money on food. We threw them out. AND they were out of season but I needed some peaches for this post, so they were very expensive. I had to go to Costco to get a new box of peaches. Thankfully Costco had some good ones. I love your tips on growing peach trees! Great comment, Linda

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      • July 29, 2021 at 2:45 pm
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        I never, ever buy fruit at Walmart! I have found that all fruit literally has no taste whatsoever. I don’t know why this is other than possibly buying it unripe hoping it will ripen in travel? I’ve had good luck with fruits from Costco, tho. We don’t generally have fruit stands here, nor too many farmers’ markets. I have a cling-free semi dwarf fruit tree in the back yard but my apricot trees produce bigger fruit! When the frost doesn’t get them in the spring, the fruit definitely does taste good, at least. I had sooo many apricots on my trees that I was begging neighbors and Ward members to come pick the apricots! What a horrible mess they made falling on my car (til I finally got smart and moved it) and on the concrete. I’m still picking up apricots. It was definitely a bountiful year for apricots-still waiting for the peaches to ripen.

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        • July 29, 2021 at 5:07 pm
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          Hi Robbie, I hear you about the produce from Walmart. I wonder if they buy it from the cheapest place or something!! I enjoy Costco’s fruit and vegetables too! Oh my gosh, I remember one year our neighbor had a bumper apricot crop and the whole neighborhood was over there picking it to can, dehydrate and make jam. Those were the best apricots! We all helped clean up the ones that dropped so their yard was somewhat clean after all those apricots dropped. We all felt like it was Christmas, it was truly a blessing to my young family. Gotta love those bountiful years! Linda

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    • July 27, 2021 at 6:16 am
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      Never been able to either. I just don’t buy them anymore from the stores.

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      • July 27, 2021 at 7:01 am
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        Matt,

        I only buy them at a store if they smell ripe and are “ripe soft.” No more buying baseball hard peaches for me.

        Reply
  • July 26, 2021 at 7:48 am
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    We used to give the hogs all the bad peaches that dropped on the ground. They’d get drunk cause it would ferment in their multiple high temperature stomachs. Had to back off some though cause they quit breeding cause they were too drunk

    Never heard of white peaches. Have to try that someday

    Reply
    • July 26, 2021 at 9:37 am
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      Hi Matt, oh my goodness, the hogs got drunk, now I have the giggles! I remember putting beer in tuna cans to catch snails. I caught a few snails but realized my dogs were drinking the beer, yeah they got drunk. Had to go another route. LOL! Linda

      Reply
  • July 26, 2021 at 10:28 am
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    I have been a lover of peaches most of my life. I have tried different varieties and love them all. In the off season I get bottled peaches at Costco. The come from Greece. I am not sure of the variety, but they are an excellent standby.

    Reply
    • July 26, 2021 at 11:18 am
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      Hi Roy, thanks for the heads up don’t the bottles peaches at Costco. I love hearing this, I will go get some! Love this tip, Linda

      Reply
  • July 26, 2021 at 2:58 pm
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    We have a lot of trouble with peach borer in my area. You have to spray the tree in the spring before it buds and then again in the summer. I have now lost 2 trees to this pest and it was heartbreaking. Now I have it on my calendar so I don’t forget again. Don’t forget to thin the peaches to a handspan for each one or you will get golf ball size peaches. I have 2 new peach trees that are now 2-3 years old so I’m excited they are finally getting big. As Linda commented – these trees don’t live a long time so you might want to plant a replacement when the tree gets a dozen years old.

    Reply
    • July 26, 2021 at 5:35 pm
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      Hi Kay, oh dang, those darn peach borers!! The problem is if we spray but the neighbors do not, well, we will have trouble getting rid of them. I do not have fruit trees here except for the lemon tree I just planted. But Mark and I had fruit trees for years and the peach bore was the worst! Fibgers crossed you have delicious peaches!! Linda

      Reply
    • July 27, 2021 at 7:31 am
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      Kay,

      What do you use to spray your peach trees with? I use Neem Oil or Monterey Horticultural Oil, but get mixed results.

      Reply
  • July 26, 2021 at 4:03 pm
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    We bought a house that came with two peach trees. Last July, I looked at the trees and all the peaches had disappeared! I googled it, and the likely culprits were squirrels or raccoons, who probably used the 6 foot welded wire fence as a ladder! This year, we’re running an electric fence about a foot off the ground, to hopefully keep those varmints out. I don’t mind sharing, but I want SOME of my peaches!

    Reply
    • July 26, 2021 at 5:37 pm
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      Hi Laura, oh my gosh, that would be a shock to see the peaches disappear! I don’t mind sharing either but can we at least make a peach pie, a peach cobbler, or make a bowl with peaches and cream?? Oh, I hope you get some next year!!!! Linda

      Reply
  • July 27, 2021 at 8:58 am
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    Yes, buy local!! Peaches shipped in from a distance have been picked not-quite-ripe (so they are hard and travel better, and so they won’t go past ripe and rot before sold), and they never *truly* ripen.

    My problem has been peach leaf curl.. I have to remember to spray for it early in the season. Some varieties are more resistant–I added a couple of trees, which do seem to hold up better than the first (which must be getting up to its 12-year limit now).

    Our house has a history–was the local source during Prohibition, and Jack Marden’s best known product was peach brandy! There’s supposed to be a cache buried in the cellar!

    Reply
    • July 27, 2021 at 11:44 am
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      Hi Rhonda, oh the hidden brandy! Oh my gosh, best story ever! Thanks for the heads up on the rock-hard peaches. I usually buy from fruit stands (Farmers Markets) but I needed some peaches ASAP! I will never do that again! LOL! Linda

      Reply

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