How To Stock Your Home Pharmacy

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Today it’s all about how to stock your home pharmacy. My biggest concern is having a total grid down and not being able to get some of my favorite fever reducers, for instance. I’m probably way overstocked, but that’s how I roll. I have really bad arthritis and I have to have some over the counter pain medication. Some colds are better left alone, but then it doesn’t hurt to help soothe the symptons sometimes.

We all have first aid kits and this post will cross over into the first aid kit scenario. But today I want to really focus on simple over the counter products we may use often. And if we have family visit, we need the different age appropriate medications.

When you do pick up any of these products, please check the dates. We need to rotate all of these, so let’s get the freshest ones possible. I’m a big believer in essential oils so I will share some of those as well. Please note, these will not cure anything, but they sure do soothe a cold or sinus infection.

You may be saying, I never get sick, I will never use any of these. I get it, I really do. Here’s the deal, what if you have a Pandemic hit your neighborhood? Or the Influenza? It may be nice to be prepared for the unexpected. That’s when you’ll be very grateful for taking the time to stock your home pharmacy.

Mark and I had dinner with some friends last night and we started talking about how our neighborhood needs some help getting prepared for a disaster or an unforeseen emergency. We talked about the different streets in our neighborhood and who we know are prepared, which is not very many, I’m sad to say. It’s the 90% unprepared and 10% prepared scenario. Can you imagine how many sick people will suffer if they do not have any fever reducers, for one thing?

Yes, they can pat them down with cool rags, I get it. But we may need to share our over the counter medications when necessary. If I was aware of a baby or toddler suffering I would hope I had appropriate items their mother could use. What if an older couple in your neighborhood got diarrhea because of food poisoning? Now, picture all the stores and pharmacies closed for days, or weeks. They could get dehydrated very quickly. This is why I’m writing this post today. Let’s be prepared.

Check out your local stores, dollar type stores, or box stores for the cheapest price available, and yet have an expiration date that will work for you. Sometimes we just need a little nudge to remind us to stock up on those products we may need in the near future. We can sleep at night knowing we don’t have to run to the store at midnight to purchase one or more of these items for ourselves or a neighbor.

Stock Your Home Pharmacy

Please keep in mind, these are only suggestions. I am not a doctor, nurse or anyone in the medical field. These are listed to help us think about the items we may want to stock up on.

Fever Reducers

I realize fever is a good thing sometimes to fight an infection. It’s when I can’t break a fever I get worried. I’m not a doctor, I’m a mom and a grandma, this is just my opinion.

  • Aspirin
  • Tylenol
  • Advil
  • Ibuprofen
  • Other you use

Allergy Medications

If you have ever had allergies, these may look familiar. You can see that I listed Benedryl first, yes indeed I have used that for so many issues.

  • Benedryl (Diphenhydramine)
  • Zyrtec
  • Claritin
  • Xyzal
  • Allegra
  • Eye Drops

Diarrhea Remedies/Constipation

Trust me, no one wants diarrhea when the sewer lines do not work, right? This is another reason we need our own emergency toilet and the items listed below.

Cold and Flu

This year has been a tough one for colds and flu in our area. I love knowing I have the necessary items for anyone who stays at our home and comes down with a cold or the flu.

  • Vicks VapoRub
  • Sambucol (Black Elderberry products)
  • Nyquil
  • Tylenol Cold and Flu
  • Dimetapp
  • Dayquil
  • Mucinex
  • Vicks VapoCool
  • Nasal Sprays
  • My Doctor Suggests Liquid Silver: Liquid Silver by My Doctor Suggests
  • Cough Lozenges by My Doctor Suggests: Lozenges by My Doctor Suggests

Nausea Medication/Heartburn

Just giving you the heads up here. I was able to buy Meclizine at Costco cheaper than anywhere. It’s behind the pharmacy counter and as I remember it was $3.00 for 100 tablets.

  • Pepto Bismol
  • Kaopectate
  • Dramanine
  • Bonine
  • Meclizine
  • Tums
  • Rolaids

Skin Irritations

It’s all about making sure we are comfortable if and when things go south. I can’t imagine not having some Neosporin for small cuts and wounds. Please stock up according to your families needs.

  • Epsom Salt
  • Bag Balm
  • Stokolan Cream
  • Vaseline
  • Aspercreme
  • Coconut Oil
  • Lidocaine
  • Your favorite lotion or cream
  • My Doctor Suggests Gel
  • Anti-itch Cream
  • Hydrocortisone
  • Calamine Lotion
  • Neosporin
  • Apple Cider Vinegar
  • Hydrogen Peroxide
  • Alcohol

Anti-Fungal Medications

It’s nice to have these in our stash because you never know when you may need them.

  • Monistat (vaginal yeast infections)
  • Athlete’s Foot
  • Diaper Fungal Infection

Essential Oils

Every essential oil company will have different names of their essential oils. I’m sharing the products from doTerra. This is one of my favorite Essential Oils Books you may like to have in your home. Essential Oils

My grandkids love Breathe, Peppermint, and Deep Blue.

  • Breathe
  • Deep Blue
  • Oregano
  • Wintergreen
  • OnGuard
  • Peppermint

Final Word

I hope this post helps you think about how to stock your home pharmacy very soon. We are prepping for the future for whatever comes our way. Thanks for being prepared for the unexpected. May God bless this world. Linda

First Aid Kit by Linda

16 thoughts on “How To Stock Your Home Pharmacy

  • March 5, 2019 at 7:40 am
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    Great list of OTC items to have on hand for emergencies. Nice to see a few items I hadn’t thought of to add to my stockpile – have added them to my shopping list now. 🙂
    For rehydrating folks, electrolyte packets are convenient, but will eventually expire (maybe…more on that later…) In addition to some of the packets I stock the ingredients for oral rehydration solution. The formula I use is really simple: 1/2 liter of water, 1 tablespoon of sugar, 1/8 teaspoon of baking soda, 1/8 teaspoon of Morton’s Lite Salt (half regular salt and half potassium salt.) Stored separately the ingredients have an indefinite shelf life. When dry mixed, it’s best used within a year. When mixed into water it should be used within 24 hours for best effectiveness.
    There have been studies on expiration dates of medicine, both OTC and prescription and a surprising number of them are safe and effective more than a decade after the best by date. Liquid medicines are not as robust, so I tend to rotate them out early and often, but real pills I keep until needed.
    Here are few useful articles so folks can make their own judgements on when to toss out old medicines:
    https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/drug-expiration-dates-do-they-mean-anything
    https://www.propublica.org/article/the-myth-of-drug-expiration-dates?utm_source=pocket&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=pockethits
    Thanks for all the great prepping articles!

    Reply
    • March 5, 2019 at 9:51 am
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      Hi DmWalsh, thanks for the links!! I love it! It’s all about being prepared for the unexpected! Great comment! Linda

      Reply
  • March 5, 2019 at 8:57 am
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    Not only is this good for a disaster, it is good for convenience. Who wants to go out in the middle of the night, to find a store that is open, so you can overpay for some Tylenol at a convenience store.

    Reply
    • March 5, 2019 at 9:53 am
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      Hi Janet, I know the prices at those convenience stores are outrageous!! I never want to go out to find Tylenol at midnight either! Great comment! Linda

      Reply
  • March 5, 2019 at 9:29 pm
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    Thanks, Linda ~
    I have a pretty well stocked supply with OTC, natural (herbs, EOs) and other stock (rubber gloves, first aid items, etc.). I am probably not as stocked as you are but I feel pretty confident.

    One thing that I would add to your post: learn how to make home remedies. John at Learning Herbs has a great herbal remedy kit with just about everything one needs to learn how to make salves, syrups, teas/infusions, etc. I purchased one a few years ago (they run about $100) but teach the basics to make your own herbal medicines. For example: I learned how to make my own elderberry syrup – the dried berries were included along with bottle(s) to bottle the syrup once made. Now I keep the ingredients on hand all the time. I purchase dried elderberries from Mountain Rose Herbs out of Eugene Oregon and keep these along with the other items needed to make the syrup. I also keep the ingredients to make salves/balms so that I don’t have to rely on pharmaceuticals all the time. I do keep pain relievers, etc., from the drug store but they are a fairly minor part of my kit.

    I have also learned how to identify “weeds” that have beneficial properties. I have learned what those properties are and how I would be able to use them if/when an emergency occurs.

    We need to educate ourselves. I always believed that once you have an education, no one can take that away from you!!

    Reply
    • March 6, 2019 at 5:34 am
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      Hi Leanne, what a great comment!!! I buy Elderberry products, but I need to make them!! I also want to make my own salves! You’ve inspired me. I need to get with it! Love it! Linda

      Reply
  • March 6, 2019 at 10:04 am
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    Maybe the “My Doctor suggests Gel” should read as “Aloe Gel”?

    Reply
      • March 6, 2019 at 12:34 pm
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        What kind of “gel” do you think that the doctor suggests then? If you get Solarcaine or an equivalent of it then you get the Aloe Vera gel along with the Lidocaine.

        Reply
  • March 8, 2019 at 9:16 am
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    Great list, thank you. I agree with learning and growing more herbal remedies. I joined an herbalism subscription box that sends me a box full of recipes and supplies every other month to make my own salves, elderberry syrup, tinctures and more. It has a featured herb each month so I learn them one herb at a time. Best investment I have made in learning herbs and taking care of my family. It’s called ApotheBox.

    Reply
    • March 8, 2019 at 9:46 am
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      Hi Deanna, oh I have got to look into this group! I really want to make my own salves and Elderberry syrup. Great comment! Linda

      Reply

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