What To Do When There Is No Medical Help

What To Do When There Is No Medical Help

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No medical help? My biggest fear is for other people when there is no medical help after a major disaster. I’m prepared to do many things, even stitches if I had to do them. I can use a splint to help with a broken arm. Please note, I am not a doctor, nurse or anyone in the medical field. I have learned to heal my own body. When I was young we never ran to the doctor for anything. My mother used a purple violet spray on strep throat. Did it work? Well, I’m still alive. I grew up in the age of chicken pox, measles, and even polio. Medicine has come a long way, some ways for the better and some ways not so great. Trust me, I am not against using any doctors, I just think we need to be prepared to take care of ourselves if the SHTF, it’s not if, but when.

I have told you before Mark and I took some C.E.R.T. classes where we learned to use splints, dress or not dress certain burns, how to label the wounded that were too far gone to help, and so much more. This will be hard for me because I love to help people, but more people need to know how to do a few minor medical procedures than ever before. If and when we have a grid down you need some hard copy books in your possession to recognize some medical issues and do the very best you can.

This is how I see it, there are leaders and there are followers. After a disaster or grid down we will have both of these and more, like the disrupters. Some people may become hysterical after just a few days without electricity because they are not sure what to do. One or more people will take charge, some will look to you for help. This is why it is critical we have a few tools to get us through a minor or major collapse. No professional medical help will be a huge issue. Here’s the deal, all medical personnel, and emergency responders will be called to the hospitals or medical clinics. Possibly even your local schools will become a place of refuge to help those in need of medical help.

Well, this means we will be on our own. So, here are my thoughts to get us through something like this, all comments and responses will be greatly appreciated.

No Medical Help

Water:

Water will be a key element to hydrate those people who have very little water stored. I recommend storing at least 4-gallons of water per person per day. It’s quite likely some of your neighbors will have no water stored. I’m not addressing food storage today.

First aid kit:

I have a printable list for you, but I would take stock of all the over the counter drugs you use quite regularly. Please add Benadryl, my neighbors borrow mine all the time. I stock and rotate all my over the counter drugs as well as my essential oils. PRINTABLE: First Aid Kit

First aid book:

Please get a hard copy as we may not have the internet, The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way

First aid skills:

Please learn CPR, take a C.E.R.T. class and an EMT class. Community Emergency Response Team

Remember, we may have no medical help for days, weeks or months.

Bleach:

I realize some people are really against bleach, well we will need lots of bleach to get rid of MRSE or dangerous sewage contamination. Please note, bleach only stores for typically 9-12 months. Look into pool tablets for SHOCK treatments for water containers, like a backyard pool, and store some of them as well.

Supplies:

You can never have too many supplies, start stocking up on all items we could use as a neighborhood to help ourselves and those around us. The pharmacies will be closed and empty after a major disaster. What you have in your house this very minute may be all you have to save your family. Supplies can be water, food, tools, knives, weapons, etc. Please order some N-95 masks or N-100 masks as you can afford them, you can never have too many. 3M 1860 Medical Mask N95, 20 Count

Blankets:

We can always use all our blankets to lay critically hurt people on the ground or cover them to try and prevent shock. Never give away usable blankets.

Make a roster for your neighborhood:

Please make a plan with those neighbors who are interested in participating in a monthly meeting to share skills and things we can all bring to the table, so to speak, after a disaster. I’ve said this before, that neighbor down the street with a chainsaw may be your new best friend. Only include those neighbors you feel comfortable working with and you can trust to step up and help.

Contact list of neighbors:

If we need to try and email or call family members of neighbors we need a list of contacts if and when any power is restored. If a certain neighbor is critically hurt we need to be able to contact a close family member or friend.

Critical items:

Walkie talkies, flashlights, headlamps, as well as whistles, are must have items. Remember disasters don’t always happen in the daylight hours. Please be prepared with batteries or solar flashlights.

Make a plan with neighbors:

Do it this week, next week may be too late. Only choose neighbors you can count on to be on your team. Decide who will be in charge and list the items each family has to contribute and teach others the skills we will all need to survive. Pass a list around and list what items we each have and the items we need to get. I’m not talking about sharing how much food or cash you have, this is mainly getting to know your neighbors. Seeing them at church each week is NOT going to get the job done. You must KNOW your neighbors or at the least the ones you want to have on your team if you are going to work together to make a difference during and after a disaster situation. Now, make a plan for survival as a team.

Garbage Bags:

Store a lot of large black bags to dispose of refuse to burn later and also to possibly to cover the dead.

Colored tape and large colored squares to label homes:

These are the tapes or colored cards we need in every home to help us know who needs help and who is okay for right now.

BLUE: handicapped person lives in this home
ScotchBlue Painter’s Tape, Multi-Use, 1.41-Inch by 60-Yard, 1 Roll

RED: needs immediate help
NPS CT-610 Triage Marking Tape 300′ Red

YELLOW: delay, does not need immediate help

NPS CT-611 Triage Marking Tape 300′ Yellow

GREEN: person or family is okay
NPS CT-612 Triage Marking Tape 300′ Green

Painter’s sticks:

Get them from Home Depot or your local hardware store work great for splints. Be sure and store non-stick gauze to wrap a broken arm on the splint.

Classes :

Take a class on how to do stitches and learn to use a stethoscope. If we can’t help majorly hurt people we will have to step over them and help those we can help. This sounds cold, but I learned this from my C.E.R.T. class. Those that are majorly hurt will have to wait for medical personnel. Yes, they may die, but we can only do what we can do.

I hope we never have to deal with any of this, but I know it’s inevitable, so we must be prepared for the unexpected. Please be ready to help your family when there is no medical help on the way.

What are your plans to be better prepared when medical help isn’t readily available?

Readers comments:

Janet: One thing I thought of is butterfly bandages. (Now people use steri strips) Growing up, my mother (a nurse) used butterfly bandages to close a cut. We didn’t run to the doctor for much.

Center for Disease Control

Comments

  1. One thing I thought of is butterfly bandages. (Now people use steri strips) Growing up, my mother (a nurse) used butterfly bandages to close a cut. We didn’t run to the doctor for much.

    • Hi Janet, I have lots of butterfly bandages. It’s awesome your mom is a nurse! I’m going to add your statement to the post. Thank you, Linda

    • I haven’t seen butterfly bandages for quite some time, but I do keep steri strips in my med kit.

      Your story reminds me of a summer I spent with my aunt. I cut my arm quite badly and my aunt lived 2 hours from the closest town. She grabbed her sewing kit and stitched me up with a needle and thread. You know, I don’t even have a scar. *G*

      • Great to have someone resourceful in an emergency. I am sure your aunt was such a person.

      • HI, Mare, I have the giggles thinking about your aunt stitching your arm with regular thread and a needle, ouch! The only place you can find butterfly bandaids is behind the pharmacy counters. Of course on Amazon as well. Not sure why they hide them there. No scar, your aunt rocks! Linda

  2. Some very good pointers, Linda! Thanks for another great post.

    How are you and Mark holding up in this heat? I hope you are both doing well. Hugs to you, Mare

    • Hi Mare, the heat is fine when you have A/C! I’m worried about you, the news said they are evacuating homes around Bryce Canyon, yikes! There is a fire started by humans, not good. I’m hoping you are far away from there my friend! Hugs, Linda

      • It’s actually Brian Head, not Bryce. I’m between the two. It’s currently at 0$ containment, but they have the heavy hitters on their way in. It is smoky, here, but so far isn’t a threat. Here’s the info from the latest fact sheet from utfire.gov:

        Summary: Fire was reported at 1220 PM fire rapidly spread upslope.
        Start Date: Saturday, June 17, 2017
        Location: Northeast side of the town of Brian Head
        Jurisdiction: Brian Head Town, Iron County; Dixie national Forest and BLM lands are threatened
        Fire Size: Estimated at 350 acres. (Note: one acre is equivalent to one football field).
        Cause: Under Investigation
        Closures: Hwy 143 is closed.
        Evacuations: Brian Head Town approx. 500 residents and visitors have evacuated
        Structures: Town of Brian Head is immediately threatened
        Fuels: Heavy timber.
        Fire Crews/Resources: Multiple engines from local, state and federal agencies are on scene. Multiple air
        tankers and helicopters are on scene. A Type III Incident Management Team has been ordered and will
        arrive this evening. A Type II Incident Management Team will arrive mid-day tomorrow.

  3. while I myself would not be able to set broken bones or stitch a wound, I have my sister, and grand daughter that are both EMT’s and my sister and daughter have taken cert training also. and the lady across the road is an ex- army nurse. I do have several first aid kits, along with other medical supplies. I try to order something each month. I try to keep bleach, rubbing alcohol,vinegar,peroxide,witch hazel,neosporin, anti-diarrhea, and cortizone cream on hand at all times.I also have a good supply of various essential oils and herbs.

    • Hi Judy, you are the woman with all these supplies! It looks like we think alike, those are all my favorite ones! The one thing I have not used a lot of are herbs. I need to get on that one. Great comment, Linda

  4. Cheri Young says:

    I have a supply of unscented (aka original scent) bleach tablets. They dissolve in hot and cold water as well as take up little space like bottled bleach. Though there is no information on shelf life, what I have read has assured me that because they are dry their shelf life should be quite a lot longer than liquid bleach. They are under $3.00 for 32 tablets. I try to be as chemical free as possible in our house, however these tablets occasionally come in handy.

    • Hi Cheri, thanks for the information on the bleach tablets. I found little information on them as well. When we need bleach, we need bleach whether wet or dry. Great comment, Linda

  5. Debbie O. says:

    One thing I would like to know is how to deal with a dental emergency. One Friday night of a holiday weekend I broke a tooth and it was so painful. Nothing I tried helped the pain. Tuesday was the first day I could get help for the tooth because my dentist (the only one in town) was on vacation. And indeed the tooth needed a root canal, and I was in pain after that too. I call that my “lost week” because one tooth incapacitated me for an entire week. Childbirth incapacitated me for a day or two.

    • Debbie, oh my gosh, that’s awful! I have to laugh childbirth incapacitated you a day or two. I would recommend the essential oil Oregano next time but here’s the deal. Let me see what my medical handbook says. The scary deal with our mouth is the infection can go to our brain and bloodstream so quickly. I highly recommend this book for emergencies: “The Survival Medicine Handbook” by Joseph Alton M.D. and Amy Alton A.R.N.P. it’s available on Amazon. It’s my bible for health care. Next time go to the ER, I had a neighbor die from Sepsis from a tooth infection. They are extremely dangerous. I’m glad you finally got to see the dentist. I am reading to use clove oil as well. This book is worth every penny if we are not doctors. The book talks about Tempanol (I think that’s a prescription), Cavit and Den-temp. Holy moly, I need to get on this ASAP! I need to talk to my prepper doctor and see what he recommends. Great comment, Linda

      • Debbie O. says:

        I know that it’s important to see a dentist when you can, but what if the SHTF? I think there would be more info out there, but the dental community hasn’t been that helpful when I’ve asked about preps for a problem. No one wants to think of what to do in a case like that, but I tell you, the pain was so bad in that tooth, I was almost willing to pull it myself. Luckily the tooth could be saved, but the extreme pain I had, I believe, was unnecessary. If I could have treated it until I could have gone to the dentist, it would have been better! I haven’t found any kits for teeth either. You mentioned Cavit and I just now found that on Ebay. Perhaps that could have helped with the exposed nerve. I would love to put together a dental kit for emergencies.

        • Hi Debbie, I am going to call my dentist tomorrow. I will drop by there and see what he says if he’s open tomorrow. Your extreme pain is something we will all have to deal with when the SHTF! I’m all over this girlfriend! I’ll keep you posted! Linda

        • Debbie, on more thing, that medical book I told you about tells exactly what to do. BUT, I need to order the supplies, ASAP. We all need to know what to do with this tooth pain, yikes!!

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What To Do When There Is No Medical Help

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No medical help? My biggest fear is for other people when there is no medical help after a major disaster. I’m prepared to do many things, even stitches if I had to do them. I can use a splint to help with a broken arm. Please note, I am not a doctor, nurse or anyone in the medical field. I have learned to heal my own body. When I was young we never ran to the doctor for anything. My mother used a purple violet spray on strep throat. Did it work? Well, I’m still alive. I grew up in the age of chicken pox, measles, and even polio. Medicine has come a long way, some ways for the better and some ways not so great. Trust me, I am not against using any doctors, I just think we need to be prepared to take care of ourselves if the SHTF, it’s not if, but when.

I have told you before Mark and I took some C.E.R.T. classes where we learned to use splints, dress or not dress certain burns, how to label the wounded that were too far gone to help, and so much more. This will be hard for me because I love to help people, but more people need to know how to do a few minor medical procedures than ever before. If and when we have a grid down you need some hard copy books in your possession to recognize some medical issues and do the very best you can.

This is how I see it, there are leaders and there are followers. After a disaster or grid down we will have both of these and more, like the disrupters. Some people may become hysterical after just a few days without electricity because they are not sure what to do. One or more people will take charge, some will look to you for help. This is why it is critical we have a few tools to get us through a minor or major collapse. No professional medical help will be a huge issue. Here’s the deal, all medical personnel, and emergency responders will be called to the hospitals or medical clinics. Possibly even your local schools will become a place of refuge to help those in need of medical help.

Well, this means we will be on our own. So, here are my thoughts to get us through something like this, all comments and responses will be greatly appreciated.

No Medical Help

Water:

Water will be a key element to hydrate those people who have very little water stored. I recommend storing at least 4-gallons of water per person per day. It’s quite likely some of your neighbors will have no water stored. I’m not addressing food storage today.

First aid kit:

I have a printable list for you, but I would take stock of all the over the counter drugs you use quite regularly. Please add Benadryl, my neighbors borrow mine all the time. I stock and rotate all my over the counter drugs as well as my essential oils. PRINTABLE: First Aid Kit

First aid book:

Please get a hard copy as we may not have the internet, The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way

First aid skills:

Please learn CPR, take a C.E.R.T. class and an EMT class. Community Emergency Response Team

Remember, we may have no medical help for days, weeks or months.

Bleach:

I realize some people are really against bleach, well we will need lots of bleach to get rid of MRSE or dangerous sewage contamination. Please note, bleach only stores for typically 9-12 months. Look into pool tablets for SHOCK treatments for water containers, like a backyard pool, and store some of them as well.

Supplies:

You can never have too many supplies, start stocking up on all items we could use as a neighborhood to help ourselves and those around us. The pharmacies will be closed and empty after a major disaster. What you have in your house this very minute may be all you have to save your family. Supplies can be water, food, tools, knives, weapons, etc. Please order some N-95 masks or N-100 masks as you can afford them, you can never have too many. 3M 1860 Medical Mask N95, 20 Count

Blankets:

We can always use all our blankets to lay critically hurt people on the ground or cover them to try and prevent shock. Never give away usable blankets.

Make a roster for your neighborhood:

Please make a plan with those neighbors who are interested in participating in a monthly meeting to share skills and things we can all bring to the table, so to speak, after a disaster. I’ve said this before, that neighbor down the street with a chainsaw may be your new best friend. Only include those neighbors you feel comfortable working with and you can trust to step up and help.

Contact list of neighbors:

If we need to try and email or call family members of neighbors we need a list of contacts if and when any power is restored. If a certain neighbor is critically hurt we need to be able to contact a close family member or friend.

Critical items:

Walkie talkies, flashlights, headlamps, as well as whistles, are must have items. Remember disasters don’t always happen in the daylight hours. Please be prepared with batteries or solar flashlights.

Make a plan with neighbors:

Do it this week, next week may be too late. Only choose neighbors you can count on to be on your team. Decide who will be in charge and list the items each family has to contribute and teach others the skills we will all need to survive. Pass a list around and list what items we each have and the items we need to get. I’m not talking about sharing how much food or cash you have, this is mainly getting to know your neighbors. Seeing them at church each week is NOT going to get the job done. You must KNOW your neighbors or at the least the ones you want to have on your team if you are going to work together to make a difference during and after a disaster situation. Now, make a plan for survival as a team.

Garbage Bags:

Store a lot of large black bags to dispose of refuse to burn later and also to possibly to cover the dead.

Colored tape and large colored squares to label homes:

These are the tapes or colored cards we need in every home to help us know who needs help and who is okay for right now.

BLUE: handicapped person lives in this home
ScotchBlue Painter’s Tape, Multi-Use, 1.41-Inch by 60-Yard, 1 Roll

RED: needs immediate help
NPS CT-610 Triage Marking Tape 300′ Red

YELLOW: delay, does not need immediate help

NPS CT-611 Triage Marking Tape 300′ Yellow

GREEN: person or family is okay
NPS CT-612 Triage Marking Tape 300′ Green

Painter’s sticks:

Get them from Home Depot or your local hardware store work great for splints. Be sure and store non-stick gauze to wrap a broken arm on the splint.

Classes :

Take a class on how to do stitches and learn to use a stethoscope. If we can’t help majorly hurt people we will have to step over them and help those we can help. This sounds cold, but I learned this from my C.E.R.T. class. Those that are majorly hurt will have to wait for medical personnel. Yes, they may die, but we can only do what we can do.

I hope we never have to deal with any of this, but I know it’s inevitable, so we must be prepared for the unexpected. Please be ready to help your family when there is no medical help on the way.

What are your plans to be better prepared when medical help isn’t readily available?

Readers comments:

Janet: One thing I thought of is butterfly bandages. (Now people use steri strips) Growing up, my mother (a nurse) used butterfly bandages to close a cut. We didn’t run to the doctor for much.

Center for Disease Control

  1. Janet says:

    One thing I thought of is butterfly bandages. (Now people use steri strips) Growing up, my mother (a nurse) used butterfly bandages to close a cut. We didn’t run to the doctor for much.

    1. Linda Loosli says:

      Hi Janet, I have lots of butterfly bandages. It’s awesome your mom is a nurse! I’m going to add your statement to the post. Thank you, Linda

    2. Mare says:

      I haven’t seen butterfly bandages for quite some time, but I do keep steri strips in my med kit.

      Your story reminds me of a summer I spent with my aunt. I cut my arm quite badly and my aunt lived 2 hours from the closest town. She grabbed her sewing kit and stitched me up with a needle and thread. You know, I don’t even have a scar. *G*

      1. Janet says:

        Great to have someone resourceful in an emergency. I am sure your aunt was such a person.

      2. Linda Loosli says:

        HI, Mare, I have the giggles thinking about your aunt stitching your arm with regular thread and a needle, ouch! The only place you can find butterfly bandaids is behind the pharmacy counters. Of course on Amazon as well. Not sure why they hide them there. No scar, your aunt rocks! Linda

  2. Mare says:

    Some very good pointers, Linda! Thanks for another great post.

    How are you and Mark holding up in this heat? I hope you are both doing well. Hugs to you, Mare

    1. Linda Loosli says:

      Hi Mare, the heat is fine when you have A/C! I’m worried about you, the news said they are evacuating homes around Bryce Canyon, yikes! There is a fire started by humans, not good. I’m hoping you are far away from there my friend! Hugs, Linda

      1. Mare says:

        It’s actually Brian Head, not Bryce. I’m between the two. It’s currently at 0$ containment, but they have the heavy hitters on their way in. It is smoky, here, but so far isn’t a threat. Here’s the info from the latest fact sheet from utfire.gov:

        Summary: Fire was reported at 1220 PM fire rapidly spread upslope.
        Start Date: Saturday, June 17, 2017
        Location: Northeast side of the town of Brian Head
        Jurisdiction: Brian Head Town, Iron County; Dixie national Forest and BLM lands are threatened
        Fire Size: Estimated at 350 acres. (Note: one acre is equivalent to one football field).
        Cause: Under Investigation
        Closures: Hwy 143 is closed.
        Evacuations: Brian Head Town approx. 500 residents and visitors have evacuated
        Structures: Town of Brian Head is immediately threatened
        Fuels: Heavy timber.
        Fire Crews/Resources: Multiple engines from local, state and federal agencies are on scene. Multiple air
        tankers and helicopters are on scene. A Type III Incident Management Team has been ordered and will
        arrive this evening. A Type II Incident Management Team will arrive mid-day tomorrow.

        1. Linda Loosli says:

          Hi, Mare, wow! This fire is shown all over FaceBook and the local news. This is a HUGE fire at 350 acres and still not contained. I hope it stays away from where you love, Thanks for sharing with me. God bless those families and workers involved. Be safe, hugs, Linda

          1. Mare says:

            There haven’t been any updates since about 9pm last night, but, at that time it was over 500 acres and still at 0% containment. By evening they had several hot shot teams in and the level III management team was in place. St. George News has a live update page, so I’m hoping they’ll start updating again this morning. Here’s the Twitter feed, which people are updating most frequently: https://twitter.com/hashtag/BrianHeadFire?src=hash and here’s the St. George page: http://www.stgeorgeutah.com/news/archive/2017/06/17/mgk-brian-head-fire-evacuations-underway/#.WUWnBujyvDc

          2. Linda Loosli says:

            Thanks Mare, you are awesome! Linda

          3. Mare says:

            As of 9 minutes ago, it’s up to almost 1000 acres.

          4. Linda Loosli says:

            Mare, oh my gosh, that’s terrible. Linda

          5. Linda Loosli says:

            Mare, one of my neighbors is a firefighter up there. I’m praying for the workers, firefighters, and families! Linda

          6. Mare says:

            As am I. Please, when you see your neighbor, let him know how much we appreciate him and all of the others. Some good news was released about 9pm last night. They’ve got the fire 4% contained, now.

  3. Judy P says:

    while I myself would not be able to set broken bones or stitch a wound, I have my sister, and grand daughter that are both EMT’s and my sister and daughter have taken cert training also. and the lady across the road is an ex- army nurse. I do have several first aid kits, along with other medical supplies. I try to order something each month. I try to keep bleach, rubbing alcohol,vinegar,peroxide,witch hazel,neosporin, anti-diarrhea, and cortizone cream on hand at all times.I also have a good supply of various essential oils and herbs.

    1. Linda Loosli says:

      Hi Judy, you are the woman with all these supplies! It looks like we think alike, those are all my favorite ones! The one thing I have not used a lot of are herbs. I need to get on that one. Great comment, Linda

  4. Cheri Young says:

    I have a supply of unscented (aka original scent) bleach tablets. They dissolve in hot and cold water as well as take up little space like bottled bleach. Though there is no information on shelf life, what I have read has assured me that because they are dry their shelf life should be quite a lot longer than liquid bleach. They are under $3.00 for 32 tablets. I try to be as chemical free as possible in our house, however these tablets occasionally come in handy.

    1. Linda Loosli says:

      Hi Cheri, thanks for the information on the bleach tablets. I found little information on them as well. When we need bleach, we need bleach whether wet or dry. Great comment, Linda

  5. Debbie O. says:

    One thing I would like to know is how to deal with a dental emergency. One Friday night of a holiday weekend I broke a tooth and it was so painful. Nothing I tried helped the pain. Tuesday was the first day I could get help for the tooth because my dentist (the only one in town) was on vacation. And indeed the tooth needed a root canal, and I was in pain after that too. I call that my “lost week” because one tooth incapacitated me for an entire week. Childbirth incapacitated me for a day or two.

    1. Linda Loosli says:

      Debbie, oh my gosh, that’s awful! I have to laugh childbirth incapacitated you a day or two. I would recommend the essential oil Oregano next time but here’s the deal. Let me see what my medical handbook says. The scary deal with our mouth is the infection can go to our brain and bloodstream so quickly. I highly recommend this book for emergencies: “The Survival Medicine Handbook” by Joseph Alton M.D. and Amy Alton A.R.N.P. it’s available on Amazon. It’s my bible for health care. Next time go to the ER, I had a neighbor die from Sepsis from a tooth infection. They are extremely dangerous. I’m glad you finally got to see the dentist. I am reading to use clove oil as well. This book is worth every penny if we are not doctors. The book talks about Tempanol (I think that’s a prescription), Cavit and Den-temp. Holy moly, I need to get on this ASAP! I need to talk to my prepper doctor and see what he recommends. Great comment, Linda

      1. Debbie O. says:

        I know that it’s important to see a dentist when you can, but what if the SHTF? I think there would be more info out there, but the dental community hasn’t been that helpful when I’ve asked about preps for a problem. No one wants to think of what to do in a case like that, but I tell you, the pain was so bad in that tooth, I was almost willing to pull it myself. Luckily the tooth could be saved, but the extreme pain I had, I believe, was unnecessary. If I could have treated it until I could have gone to the dentist, it would have been better! I haven’t found any kits for teeth either. You mentioned Cavit and I just now found that on Ebay. Perhaps that could have helped with the exposed nerve. I would love to put together a dental kit for emergencies.

        1. Linda Loosli says:

          Hi Debbie, I am going to call my dentist tomorrow. I will drop by there and see what he says if he’s open tomorrow. Your extreme pain is something we will all have to deal with when the SHTF! I’m all over this girlfriend! I’ll keep you posted! Linda

        2. Linda Loosli says:

          Debbie, on more thing, that medical book I told you about tells exactly what to do. BUT, I need to order the supplies, ASAP. We all need to know what to do with this tooth pain, yikes!!

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