What Emergency Stove Should I Buy Today

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I am asked all the time, “what emergency stove should I buy today?” This is the number one emergency stove I recommend because it uses very little fuel and it’s cheap to buy. I have sent one of these stoves to three of my daughters and I am getting ready to ship one to my fourth daughter.

If you have a gas barbecue that’s awesome, but gas barbecues use a lot of propane to boil a pot of water. It’s a good idea to store several tanks of propane if your city and county allow it. Don’t get me wrong, I love my barbecue, but it’s not practical in an emergency situation unless you have a freezer full of meat you want to serve the neighborhood because the power has been out for four to five days.

As fall and winter approaches, I always like to make sure I have plenty of fuel and different ways to cook should we lose power. I actually used my butane stove when I gave my electric glass top stove to my daughter and had to wait three months to get a gas line run for a gas stove. Yes, this stove works great and uses very little fuel.

Oh yes, we can have sandwiches, crackers and many more non-cooked items for meals for a short time anyway. But what happens if we lose power for a week, two weeks or more. I would much rather have some hot macaroni and cheese. We could all make do with whatever we have in our pantry or empty the refrigerator of the perishable food items. But I want to be able to boil water if I need to, or cook a hot meal when the power is out.

I suggest with winter coming to please think about getting some kind of a small stove if you have no other heat source. If you have a fireplace you could rig up something, if you have wood or coal to burn. If you have a wood burning stove you will be set if you have the fuel stored. We used to have one, they are awesome to heat your home or cook on. We hauled lumber every year, we even used coal. Now I have blankets stored to keep us warm.

How To Use A Butane Emergency Stove:

You don’t have to spend a lot of money on anything. This particular stove, the Gourmet Chef, I am showing today is fairly inexpensive. I have cooked on a stove just like this in cooking classes. I have had this one a very long time, I bought this brand for my daughter’s: Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and I suggest extra fuel: GasOne Butane Fuel Canister (12 Pack)

What Emergency Stove Should I Buy Today | By FoodStorageMoms.com

The right side of the stove opens up to load the butane canister of fuel. You remove the red cap and slip the canister in and it lays in the shallow area where the latch is on the top right side. Make sure the notch in the top of the canister is pointing up when laid in the slot. You close the side lid and slowly ignite the stove. Yep, you are ready to cook! I have used mine so many times I have to use a match or lighter to ignite the flame.

I crack the window when I use this indoors, the instructions say use outdoors only. I would never use any other kind of stove inside with any other fuel. To be safe you can cook on it outside and not worry about the fumes or flammability. Please follow the directions and be safe while cooking on this emergency stove. Butane is highly flammable.

Butane Emergency Stove:

What’s really nice about one of these stoves you can take them camping, to family reunions or to the park. Always check with the location you are planning on using this little gem to cook your meals just to sure you don’t get a citation or something.

Butane Shelf Life:

I have heard 8 years but, I have also heard 1-2 years. If the fuel dissipates out of the canisters we will all soon know the real shelf life of butane.

Propane Shelf Life: Indefinitely

Survival food storage by Linda

 

24 thoughts on “What Emergency Stove Should I Buy Today

  • October 8, 2013 at 7:23 am
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    Great idea. I love the portability of this little stove. We had an ice storm (many years ago) and the power was out for two weeks. I cooked on a kerosene heater which was the only emergency heat we had at the time.

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    • October 8, 2013 at 12:16 pm
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      Hi Brenda, I am so glad to hear you had a kerosene heater. I really want to get the word out about be prepared for the unexpected. You rock! Hugs! Linda

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  • October 8, 2013 at 7:54 am
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    I needed this post a couple weeks ago. 🙂 It doesn’t go out too much where we live but it did and I had no plan, so it was an unplanned $20 dinner out–not the worst thing in the world but I sure wish I had a backup! Thanks for sharing.

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    • October 8, 2013 at 12:18 pm
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      Kimberly, Thanks for commenting….you might want to order a stove TODAY! LOL! It costs about $20.00. I am just kidding….we really never know when we might need something like that. You were able to go out to eat anyway…life is good! Hugs! Linda

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    • October 8, 2013 at 12:19 pm
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      Hi TaMara, I try to remind people to be prepared for the unexpected. I am so glad I have met you through blogging! Hugs! Linda

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  • October 8, 2013 at 11:11 pm
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    I REALLY need to get one of these. I am totally unprepared if the power went out for any amount of time 🙁 Love your little stove. I’ll have to Google it and see where I can get one!

    Shauna @ The Best Blog Recipes

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    • October 9, 2013 at 5:50 am
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      Shauna, you can purchase them just about anywhere. This is why I usually put the item below my posts so people can order them through Amazon.com. Life gets so hectic….online shopping is awesome! Thanks for stopping by! Hugs! Linda

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  • October 9, 2013 at 4:16 am
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    I found a portable gas BBQ grill on clearance for $9.00 last weekend! And scored a kerosene heater at a garage sale for $15.00! Feeling a little more prepared 🙂

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    • October 9, 2013 at 5:51 am
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      Jo, you did score on some awesome items! You are rocking with preparing for the unexpected! Hugs! Linda

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    • October 9, 2013 at 12:43 pm
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      Joyce I know the instructions say to use it with adequate ventilation. I have taught classes inside stores with it. I have boiled water and cooked small batches with it. It would be beneficial since it is gas to crack a window or door when using.

      Reply
  • October 10, 2013 at 5:29 am
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    I have a propane crockpot and a propane burner that I use for tailgating and would be wonderful for power losses!

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    • October 10, 2013 at 7:41 am
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      Deb, I did not know they made a propane crockpot. Have you tried a Saratoga Jack’s Thermal Cooker? No power needed after you bring the food to a boil for 4 minutes. Food is done in 6-7 hours. Or it keeps your chili hot for tailgating. Can you please tell me the Brand/Name of your propane crockpot…I would love to know about it! You rock! Thank you! Hugs! Linda

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  • August 7, 2015 at 8:48 am
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    Great information, as always Linda. I thought they used these for catering so it was OK to use indoors without cracking a window… (If you could let me know as I am the one putting together the disaster preparedness class for WA State Home Care Workers.) I recently bought one of these and had not bought the fuel yet so this is easy to just order it from Amazon. I’m with you, I need to get one for my children.
    Have a blessed today, Gayle

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    • August 7, 2015 at 7:01 pm
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      Hi Gayle, it’s interesting because if you read the brochure these stoves stay they can only be used outdoors. I have taught classes for years with these provided by the stores to cook indoors because they did not have a stove to cook on or we needed extra cooking space. Plus I have seen them used by catering companies indoors as well. I used one for three months in my kitchen with a sliding glass door cracked or a window cracked open. I have to do a disclaimer as to the manufacturer suggestion of cooking with these outdoors. If we have a pandemic I need something to cook inside. Of course all fuel is combustible. Just like the gas line to our gas stoves. If you smell gas and the flame has not come on you turn off the gas. I told my daughters to crack a window when they use these. If you think about it we only need these for boiling water or heating up a can of something. We will not be cooking for hours on one. We could cook something outside on a CampChef stove if it required a long time to cook. Or use a SunOven. If it’s snowing I will be using this stove in my kitchen. I will use common sense just like you would. I hope this helps, blessings to you and your family, Linda

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  • August 7, 2015 at 7:45 pm
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    Great information Linda, as always! I will have to say that I’ve got (2) propane grills, a butane burner (like the one you’re suggesting) and I get my butane fuel at Sam’s which come (4) to a pack and I also have a Sterno Heat burner.

    I’ve also purchased a Mr. Heater for heating and have store several 1 lb. canisters and this heater will also hook up to my 20lb. LP if needed for longer heating periods.

    Thanks as always for your great information Linda.

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    • August 8, 2015 at 5:46 pm
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      Hi Kristi, man I love hearing stories likes yours! Thanks for sharing how prepared you are for the unexpected! Love this! Hugs!Linda

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  • August 8, 2015 at 2:25 am
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    What a great idea for Christmas gifts for all 7 of my kids!! I do have a generator as well as an old wood-burning stove in the basement, so I would be all right, but none of the kids have either option. Since the kids live in areas where tornadoes, hurricanes, floods and lots of snow are common occurrences, this would be a great back-up for them. I have put the stove and the propane on my wish list at Amazon so I won’t forget!

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    • August 8, 2015 at 5:47 pm
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      HI Susan, oh how I wish I had a woodburning stove! Great wish list! We need more than one type of cooking source! Hugs! Linda

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  • August 8, 2015 at 5:25 am
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    Linda,
    I have kept one of these on hand for years. Learned about them from an Asian friend who always used them for “hot pot” (cooking food at the table as you eat it). She never opened a window and the stove was always going for at least an hour or more and she would often have two going at once. I have used mine as you are suggesting–when the power is out. They are great to make coffee, heat up canned food, and to prepare my dehydrated food or Meals In A Jar. Would not be without one. It’s great that you brought this to everyone’s attention as more people need to be aware of this option.
    Norma

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    • August 8, 2015 at 5:52 pm
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      Hi Norma, I am so glad to hear you have one of the butane stoves! I used them in cooking classes provided by the stores I was teaching at and I never had a window or door cracked. The box says use outdoors probably because some people may not use common sense sometimes, I guess. They are meant to be used for heating up food and boiling water. Thanks for you comments, Hugs, Linda

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  • August 8, 2015 at 12:52 pm
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    You mention cooking on a barbeque with propane, I don’t know about anyone else but when we tried to store gallon sizes of propane our tanks leaked, and when we needed it they were empty… The worse part was that the tanks were not old… Not sure why ours leaked, but now I am gun shy when it comes to storing propane in anything but small containers… Still do not have a stove like this, thank you for the reminder… 🙂

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    • August 8, 2015 at 5:55 pm
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      Hi Karen, I have never heard of propane leaking out of tanks. People have 1000 gallon tanks or whatever on their properties for heat, etc. I am wondering if you had defective tanks. I have stored propane in certified propane tanks for many many years without a problem. Let’s talk when I get home about the type of tanks you purchased. That should not have happened. Hugs, Linda

      Reply

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